Replacing LARGE basement windows

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Old 02-26-15, 12:54 PM
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Replacing LARGE basement windows

Hi all, I'm in the initial planning stages of finishing my basement. It's a walk-out with two large windows. One window has four sections - each about 45"x25". The other one is six sections of the same size. On both, only the top corners are sliders and the rest fixed. They are double paned and have leaked out.

After nixing the idea of total replacement (for cost reasons), I think I'm just going to replace the six double panes and reuse the sliders.

My question is, how would I extend the frame? I'd have to come out about another 6" to account for framing and insulation. Right now, the frame is just 2x4's. I've got a table saw, routers and most anything else I'd need.

Part of me was thinking of buying 4/4 pine and using my biscuit joiner and glue to attach it. Or just using 2x8s ripped down and taking an 1/8" off with my jointer (I don't have a thickness planer yet). Either way, I'd have the extension recessed a bit to give me a shadow line.

Anybody have better ideas?

Thanks!

I hope this was understandable... Here's a pic:



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Old 02-26-15, 01:15 PM
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I've read your post several times and don't exactly understand what your question is. Your IGU's have probably failed because of the poor homemade glazing that probably allowed water to get around the edges and freeze. IMO trying to put new IGU's in is probably just throwing good money after bad. But it's your call.

If you are asking about how to frame up around it, any stud wall needs to be kept about 1" away from the cement foundation wall. Can't tell from your pics if your window frame extends past the cement or not. But I would probably just frame right in front of it, matching the existing framing exactly, and let the two be independant of each other, but then come back later and trim the openings out with 3/4" plywood jambs or something to tie them together.

If any of these rooms are bedrooms, I'm sure you know that there needs to be an egress window or exterior door as a fire escape.
 
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Old 02-26-15, 01:47 PM
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I'm not sure what you mean by "poor homemade glazing". The windows say 'Beta-Pane' on the aluminum between panes. I would think that if I replaced these 60 year old windows and trimmed and sealed them, they'd be fine. What am I missing?

What I'm asking is, what's the best way to extend the frame. Once I insulate with rigid foam and frame with 2x4s on top of it, I'll need to extend the window frame to match the new wall depth (like a jamb extension).
 
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Old 02-26-15, 02:13 PM
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I wasn't knocking the IGU itself... but the way the IGU has been set into the 2x4 framing looks very homemade. The fact that they lasted as long as they did is amazing. From what I can see, Beta-Pane has only been around since 1984. A testament to the fact that they don't make things as well as they used to. Course, the picture is so far away it's hard to get a good impression of the way they glass was installed. Maybe they are actually inside a mfg. frame, it just doesn't surprise me when I see people set an IGU on a 2x4 and put wood stops on either side then call it a window. That's where I'm coming from. Maybe I assumed too much.

Yeah, I think I got that 2nd part right. If you intend to put foam over the cement, you will just frame your wall right up tight to the foam... exactly framing in front of the existing openings to match their sizes. The studs will be fastened to your top and bottom plates, but nothing in between. If you "wanted to" fix the new inside framing to the old outside framing, you could use a few mending plates here and there to keep things aligned. Might help prevent twisting or bowing. The small narrow ones are nice, they nail on fairly quickly/easily.

Then measure those rough openings and make an extension jamb out of some nice plywood. If the openings are say 45x25 as you said, maybe make the boxes 44 3/4 x 24 3/4" so that they just slip into the opening. Shim them so they are level and square then finish nail them to each framing member. Make sure all those jambs are parallel with each other so that you can apply a face trim later.
 
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Old 02-27-15, 10:21 AM
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Thanks XSleeper!

I think our signals are somewhat crossed, but I see what you're saying about the IGUs. The only info I had on them was from my next door neighbor who grew up in this house after her parents built it in 1957. Now, she's a bit whacky, but she told me they were the original windows... Obviously not.

Anyway, from what you're saying, I take it that I should really look in to getting real windows put in. Originally, I was going to get large, fixed picture windows (1 or 2) in the center and put a casement on either side. I just figured that the cost would be many thousands of dollars. After a bit of looking, I see that I may have overestimated...

More research is needed!

Thanks.
 
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Old 02-27-15, 11:12 AM
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Yeah, fixed and sliding vinyl windows are available in some standard sizes (like 48x48) for a very low price. These are what you would call "builders quality" windows. Very inexpensive... better than what you have, but pretty low quality. Gets the job done, in other words.

So yeah, IMO you would be better off if you could reconfigure the existing openings with some new windows... even if they are builders quality windows. Casements will cost you a lot more. When it comes to windows, the sky is the limit as far as how much you want to spend.
 
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Old 02-27-15, 11:57 AM
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My problem is, I'm not going to buy anything that's crap - even if it's better than what I've got. I've got a Marvin dealer near me and Andersen is always an option. I imagine that even the Andersen 200 series is better than HD's Jeld-Wen windows. Although I could be wrong...

How are Marvins thought of these days?
 
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Old 02-27-15, 12:19 PM
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Andersen 200's are nice. Jeld-wen is builders grade, as a lot of the stuff in box stores is. Marvin's are a bit nicer, IMO. I'm sold on the Ultrex cladding that Marvin uses... more durable than Andersen's vinyl cladding. I have a few jobs that got hailed on this year and the Marvin's weathered the storm perfectly while the vinyl siding had been obliterated.
 
 

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