Replacing glass on old Pella casement window

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  #1  
Old 04-16-15, 11:07 AM
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Replacing glass on old Pella casement window

Our house was built in 1974. It has Pella casement windows with all wood, no plastic. The interior glass pane, which is removable, is held in place by metal clips that can be pushed into a slot to hold the pane in place. The window in question is a double window; on one side the window opens outward with a crank and the window on the other side is stationary. The exterior pane of the stationary window was broken by an errant shot from a BB gun.

I included a photo of a smaller window with the interior pane removed. It shows the interior wood strip between the glass panes and it also shows the round metal devices that help hold the wood strips in place.

One article I found online said the outside pane of glass is accessed from the inside, which means the wood strip between the windows has to be removed. How does one remove the round metal devices that help hold the wood strip in place? Has anyone replaced the exterior glass panel on one of these windows or knows the proper procedure? Any advice/recommendations on how to do this job properly will be welcomed and greatly appreciated.
 
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Old 04-16-15, 03:51 PM
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I have done it but it's a real pain in the wazoo. Those stops are really glued to the glass and the frame. Pella used a chewing gum like substance in those days and it's sticky as all get out. Your best bet would be to order a replacement sash directly from Pella.

You normally remove wood stops on each side to find the manner in which the entire sash is held in place. Without a picture of the actual broken window it's hard to tell you what to do. And then there was a period of time where Pella nailed those fixed sashes permanently to the jambs. If that's the case you are probably SOL.

And by the way, those metal grommets don't have anything to do with how the stops are held in place.
 
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Old 04-16-15, 06:17 PM
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Thank you X Sleeper

Name:  Pella interior window with crank copy.jpg
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Size:  44.9 KBThank you for your thoughts and advice. I removed one of the smaller windows that open and took it to a glass repair shop today. The wood between the glass panes looks like they are strips because there is what appears to be a groove all the way around the frame and the vertical strips definitely look like they set on top of the bottom wood strip. So when the Pella information said to remove these strips and access the broken glass from the inside of the window, it made sense. The glass repair guy said I should repair it from the outside. He said the wood strips between the glass are solid wood, not strips.

By the way, what do those metal grommets do? They extend into the wood about 1.5 inches.
 
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Old 04-16-15, 07:10 PM
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They are breather tubes that prevent the space between your exterior pane and your internal storm window from getting fogged up from condensation. It allows the humidity/dewpoint between the panes to slowly equalize with the addition of a limited amount of outside air.
 
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Old 04-19-15, 10:37 PM
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XSleeper

I thought I'd report my progress and ask another question.

You are right about the glaze being like chewing gum. It sticks to everything. I removed as much of the glaze as possible from between the glass and the wood stop before I tried to remove the stops. I found that a 5-inch long jack knife blade worked fairly well for that. I heated a pan with really soapy water and dipped my knife blade each time. The hot water/hot knife blade softened the glaze some and the soapy water reduced the stickiness of the glaze.

After I removed the glaze I took a blade out of my utility knife and tapped it between the wood stop and the window frame with a hammer until I could get a putty knife into the crack and then worked the wood stop loose.

The glass replacement place told me the glass was 3/32 inch and that it would be very easy to break when I placed the glass back into the frame and replaced the stops. (I'm sure that's true because I cracked the old glass pane several times trying to remove the glaze).

My question: Why can't I replace the glass with 1/8 inch glass and trim the wood stops down by 1/32 inch? It would give me a thicker glass less likely to break and the reduced size of the stops would bring everything back to the original dimensions so the storm window would fit properly. Can you think of any reason that wouldn't work?
 
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Old 04-20-15, 03:41 AM
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Sounds fine to me. I'm surprised its not a double pane unit but I guess that's not surprising given its age.
 
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Old 04-21-15, 03:59 AM
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The old Pella windows were not sealed insulating glass units. Go with the 1/8" glass. Clean the sealant well, try the glass and stops dry. You may find that you may not have to trim the stops. If you do, then seal and apply the trimmed stops.
 
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Old 04-21-15, 03:43 PM
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I doubt you would need to trim the stops either. If they are a billionth of an inch farther out, who cares. As long as the old stain line is covered.
 
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