Glazing a window

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Old 05-19-15, 11:11 AM
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Glazing a window

I'm using some DAP '33' window glazing after I replaced the broken window. I got a bead around the rabbet and installed the window with points. My problem is that I am trying to glaze the outside, but as I drag my putty knife thru it to make a 45° edge, it tends to pull the glazing compound apart. This is a newer container that has been closed up and appears the same as new. The only way I can get it to stick is to pull it perpendicular to the bead, not along it. Should I use another product? I have the bottom on, but I'll probably pull it out and redo it as it does not look very professional. I've watched some youtube videos and thought I was doing it the same way, but maybe this stuff is just not as liquid as what I've seen used.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 11:27 AM
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Roll/Knead the glazing in your hands to soften it up before you attempt to pull it.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 12:36 PM
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Ideally the the raw wood will be primed [and dried] first. I also like to roll the glazing in my hands [or rag if it's extra oily] first. I usually push the glazing onto the sash with my thumb and then smooth it out with a flexible putty knife [never much cared for glazing knives]
 
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Old 05-19-15, 12:39 PM
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well, I got it all on there, but it's not as professional as I'd hoped. i did knead it in my hand and the weather was warm today, so I don't think it was a matter of not being soft enough. not nearly as easy as it looked on the video i watched using the same product, but i'm not a professional either. just hope it stays on.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 12:50 PM
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Everything goes easier with practice

Provided there are no air gaps under the glazing the only reason for it to come loose is lack of primer on the wood or dirt that wasn't brushed off prior to applying the glazing. Lack of primer won't show up until a few yrs [or more] down the road.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 01:21 PM
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I haven't done a lot of glazing I guess, but enough to have noticed some significant differences in either the batches or maybe it was just the temperature and/or humidity. Seems like it went a little different each time though. Anyway, I have usually tried plain old water first, and it did work a few times, but more often went to dampening my putty knife with mineral spirits to get it to slide down the joint without pulling the glazing back out. Main thing though is to get it to adhere in the first place, which requires, as already mentioned, a good primer and kneading the product.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 01:28 PM
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thanks for the tips. I have one more to do, so I'll see how it goes next time.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 02:11 PM
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Coat the wood area were the glazing goes with linseed oil. Let it soak for awhile. Then insert the glass. Then if the glazing compound is too dry mix it with a bit of linseed oil until has a consistency of soft clay. Make a long snake or rope and using your fingers push the glazing into the corner.
Use a 45 degree angle to apply the glazing with the tool in smooth but slow sweep.



Don't worry about the corners where the two rails meet. At the end you can doctor up the corners. It doesn't need to be perfect.
For best results, glazing should be painted after it is applied.
For latex paint let cure several days
For oil paint let cure overnight.

I do this as part of my job to repair windows and screens.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 02:31 PM
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the linseed oil sounds like a good idea. DAP says to wait 7-14 days before painting and to first use an oil based primer on it. is that overkill in the summer?
 
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Old 05-19-15, 02:36 PM
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The oils in the glazing need to dry out prior to applying the primer. While the glazing will skim over in a few hours, most of it will take days to cure. That said, I've never had issues from applying a coat of oil base wood primer the next day. I'd want to wait a week or so if using a latex primer.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 03:48 PM
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ok thanks. appreciate all the advice.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 05:09 PM
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Check the specs on the glazing. I believe it will call out oil based primer specifically. Just a double check to save some grief.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 05:13 PM
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No! At work I use DAP or Red Devil and the plurb I attach to each glazing job I do says

Attn Customer:
For best results, glazing should be painted after it is applied.
For latex paint let cure several days
For oil paint let cure overnight.

This is right from the can. I attach a sticker to each window. Depending on brand the wording may be slightly different.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 06:54 PM
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From the DAP '33' product spec:
Product Painting
1. DAP® ‘33’® Glazing must be painted after it has skinned over and attained a firm set. Firm set is
typically demonstrated when a light finger touch to the surface does not leave a fingerprint. Firm
set may occur in as little as 7 days after application, but more likely 2-3 weeks after application.
Painting must be done only after firm set is achieved.
2. When painting, use only (i) a high quality exterior-grade oil-based paint, or (ii) prime with a high
quality oil-based primer and topcoat with a high quality exterior-grade acrylic-latex paint finish.
The paint line must overlap onto the face portion of the glass, as well as the bedding area where
the sash and glass meet.
 
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Old 05-19-15, 07:31 PM
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Fruitysudz, Yes that is it. I had to simplify the wording to the most basic form as possible for two reasons. One was that customer would read it and two, so that I would not plagiarizer the manufacturer.

So I should not have said NO to Czizzi's post as such.
 
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