How to fix this broken window?

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  #1  
Old 06-23-15, 03:39 PM
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How to fix this broken window?

Hello. I need a quick patch job. The whole window doesn't need to be replaced. It's a cheap garage window. Would be nice if we didn't cover the whole window though because nice to have the little natural sunlight that we get from that window. Here it is:



Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 06-23-15, 04:05 PM
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Am I not seeing this correctly? I see a window with a black triangular patch on the upper left side and what looks like a photo on top of it. Or is it a window with a picture painted on it that is broken in the left corner?

What's wrong with it? Do you want to replace the glass? Is it suppose to open? Do you want to board it up? Do you want to trim it? The white tape around the edge, is that former security tape? You need to give us more info and another picture.
 
  #3  
Old 06-23-15, 04:15 PM
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Is this picture inside, outside?
What do you mean by a patch job?
 
  #4  
Old 06-23-15, 04:29 PM
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I'd hazard a guess that there's a triangular portion broken out. The landscape is a reflection behind the picture taker and what appears to be a window in the broken area is on the other side of the garage.

That's my guess anyway. Not sure about the white lines on the glass...old alarm system maybe? Or just some sort of decoration?

If the window has a sash that opens, the easiest thing would be to remove the sash and have it reglazed at a glass shop. If it doesn't open, they can do it onsite but it will cost much more.

You can do it yourself by removing the rest of the glass, see how it fits in the opening in the sash and getting a replacement cut, then glazing it yourself.
 
  #5  
Old 06-23-15, 05:06 PM
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OK, Vic, your take seems to make sense. It's a pic taken from the outside looking in. And the small fence pic is another window on the other side of the building. Just could not get my head around it.
 
  #6  
Old 06-26-15, 10:43 AM
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I am standing outside the window. There is a triangular opening in the window. The other, smaller, window is on the other side of the garage. The vegetation is behind me and reflected in the window.

The owner wants the glass replaced. Here are some more photos of the window.

Inside:



Right arm (from inside):



Left arm (from inside):



Right arm (from outside):



Left arm (from outside):



Bottom right:



Bottom left:



How do I get this glass fixed? Trying to do as much as we can on our own to keep costs down and avoid service call fees. Thanks.
 
  #7  
Old 06-26-15, 04:59 PM
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I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but these types of windows are a pain to fix. If the hardware is able to come off without breaking then it will be OK. But when their old and rusted they usually break. Not sure where to get replacement clips and hardware. I can't quite tell but is the glass held in place with clips or is it glazed in?
 
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Old 06-26-15, 05:48 PM
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You can unscrew the arms from the sides of the sash, then if I recall, you hold the sash all the way open 90 and tip the right side higher than the left until those pins you circled in red come out of their guides.

I think this window has interior aluminum glazing strips that cover the spring clips which keep the glass pushed out tight against the external glazing. IMO, if you can get the sash out, your best bet would be to take it to a hardware store or glass shop so that they can repair the glass for you. Cut a piece of plywood to stick in the window in the meantime.

If it doesn't have aluminum glazing strips, then it is some really hard glazing that is wider than normal and is almost like cement. A real pain in the wazoo to remove, it takes a heat gun and some patience. And there are spring clips embedded in the glazing that you won't want to lose. The spring clips keep the glass tight until the window is glazed- you need both. Either way, if you can take the sash out, take it to a repair shop and they will fix you right up.
 
  #9  
Old 06-26-15, 07:11 PM
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I'm thinking he doesn't even have to unscrew anything. See how the slot in the arm has a larger opening at the top?
 
  #10  
Old 06-26-15, 07:55 PM
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Yeah, Vic maybe you're right... the bottom of the sash may lift up and out of it's pivots by tipping it slightly left and right, then once the bottom is out,tip the bottom of the sash toward you so you can lay the sash parallel with the arms and then as you raise both sash and arms overhead, the sash will slide forward on those arm guides until it stops... at which point they should pop off by slipping that enlarged part of the slot over the slot guide.

I'm used to cutting those arms off with a sawzall. LOL
 
  #11  
Old 06-27-15, 03:25 AM
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Hello. I need a quick patch job. The whole window doesn't need to be replaced.
Buy a piece of thin Plexiglas and adhere it over the broken glass with clear silicone sealant.
 
  #12  
Old 06-27-15, 03:44 AM
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I'm with Johnam on this one.
 
  #13  
Old 06-27-15, 08:19 AM
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That would be easiest. Heck, for that matter, you could just use glass. The problem would be you'd still have the hazard of the broken pane.

If the sash comes out like several of us think it will, it would probably be less than $50 at any repair place.
 
  #14  
Old 06-27-15, 11:17 AM
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Is there an instructional video for this type of window? I really appreciate the detailed instructions, but I am having a heck of a time following you.
 
  #15  
Old 06-27-15, 11:24 AM
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Also, could some pinpoint on here what exactly is the "sash." Is the sash the frame?
 
  #16  
Old 06-27-15, 11:28 AM
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The sash is the 'frame work' that holds the glass, not be confused with the actual window frame. The sash/glass opens/closes while the window frame is stationary and fastened to the structure.
 
  #17  
Old 06-27-15, 01:42 PM
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Try this. I'm not sure its the same, but it might be close.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z36keDYoVKc

Or try to Google (video search): how to fix steel frame windows Or how to replace glass on steel frame windows

Again is it glazed on or does it just have metal clips to retain the glass? Or maybe both.
 
  #18  
Old 06-27-15, 04:41 PM
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Those windows actually come out of those arms. Broke the glass a little more but at least got it out. Will need some goggles and gloves in case something goes wrong putting it in. Don't want a cut or to lose sight. Any suggestions on gloves and work glasses? Price IS an object.
 
  #19  
Old 06-27-15, 05:45 PM
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Are you planning to reglaze it yourself? You really really might want to check with a shop first. Buying everything you need for a one time job will probably cost more than what the charge would be at a shop.

The rubber gloves like they give to Big Box workers (they are cut resistant) are pretty cheap as are the glasses. (I hate those gloves cause they stink and make my hands sweat...but they work.)

Now you need whatever putty they may have used, clips if you break one, the price of the glass, etc, etc. Oops, broke the glass...pay again.

It's one thing with a little 4x6 pane using typical glazing practices, but thats a relatively big piece of glass for a newbie to be working on.

Could you explain how the sash came out? Was it like X and I expected?
 
  #20  
Old 06-27-15, 06:07 PM
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Yes, I'll call the hardware store to see if they can fix it. If not, I'll look for a glass store.

Like you said, the arm has a slot with a larger opening at the end. You pull the sash out like you opening the window, raise it up, and slide the sash out one side at a time. Getting it out is pretty straightforward. Getting it back in is a little more complicated. I actually broke more of the glass getting it back in.

That's why I was thinking better gloves next time.

Do you know what those rubber gloves are called?
 
  #21  
Old 06-27-15, 06:21 PM
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The gloves are in the work glove section of any store. I really don't know what they are called, just that they are rubber coated for grip and have some sort of threads that help with cut resistance. Just ask at the store if you decide to buy them. Prob less than $10.
 
  #22  
Old 06-28-15, 07:20 AM
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The hardware store said will take a week to fix.

How do you affix the plywood to the garage wall, which is made of cinder blocks? Drilling into the cinder blocks isn't much of an option w/ the drill that I have.

Alernatively, I suppose I could tape some plastic to the wall. But that doesn't provide much security. What kind of plastic do people usually get and what kind of tape do they usually use?

Thanks.
 
  #23  
Old 06-28-15, 07:23 AM
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Also, even supposing I can drill into the cinder block, how do I affix the plywood to it? It seems like screwing in would be hard because cinder blocks are hollow.
 
  #24  
Old 06-28-15, 07:26 AM
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Cut the plywood the same size the sash is and wedge it into the frame, add duct tape if needed.
 
  #25  
Old 06-28-15, 07:48 AM
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That's a good idea, but that is less secure than just, presumably, drilling in a larger piece over the entire opening in the wall. Also, I don't have any tools to cut a small piece the size of the sash. I think I'm stuck w/ what I can find at the hardware store.
 
  #26  
Old 06-28-15, 07:56 AM
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I'm thinking it might make most sense to get a concrete bit and some short, tapcon concrete screws or whatever and just use my battery powered drill to affix the plywood to the inside. In that way, you won't be able to push out the wood and I should be able to remove it when the window's ready. What do you think?
 
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Old 06-28-15, 08:59 AM
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Here's my drill. You see these numbers and pictures that, presumably, determine the power of the drilling.





Which one of these settings do I use for drilling through cinder block? Also, which one should I use for screwing in the concrete screws?

Thanks.
 
  #28  
Old 06-28-15, 09:54 AM
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Just as the picture says. The drill for drilling holes and the screw for screws. The numbers are a torque setting that you can use to prevent stripping the screw heads. Lower the number less torque and the drill will ratchet. For drilling you will usually want full torque. You will use anchors to secure the wood to the cinder block. The hardware store can show you several types of anchors to use. If you can find a small hardware store as opposed to the Depot or Lowes, you'll get better advice on what drill and anchors to use.

Before you start get a scrap piece of wood and experiment with driving screws. Most likely you will use Philips head screw but use a square head driver for them. If the wood is hard you will use a higher torque (larger number). Softer wood or thin pieces lower torque.

You're asking very basic questions but that's OK. Just a few times with working with power tools and a few mistakes and you'll be an expert in no time.

Seriously, don't worry about making mistakes. Even experts get it wrong sometimes but that's how we learn. You already took the first step by asking for help in this forum.
 
  #29  
Old 06-28-15, 11:12 AM
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I would check with glass shops first, it is very possible that the hardware store will ship it to the same glass shop to have the repair processed. That is why it will take a week plus. Also, specify regular glass or they will try to custom etch a integral border inset like in the original pane.
 
  #30  
Old 06-28-15, 12:18 PM
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I'm still confused about those numbers and images. Is the drill image the strongest setting? Is the screw image the weakest setting? Obviously, the higher the number, the more the drilling power. But is the highest number lower than the drill image setting? Likewise, is the lowest number higher than the screw image setting?
 
  #31  
Old 06-28-15, 01:43 PM
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Tools come with manuals that explain this type of thing. I would suggest you read yours.
 
  #32  
Old 06-28-15, 05:05 PM
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The manual is unclear on this. It seems like it is a pretty straightforward design and, therefore, I was thinking that people would just know whether the drill and screwdriver images are stronger/weaker than the numbers.
 
  #33  
Old 06-28-15, 05:15 PM
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I highly doubt the manual is unclear.

When you drill a hole with a drill bit, you match the drill bit picture with the arrow, because the clutch (which allows variable torque) will never engage when you have it set on the drill bit... it will be maximum torque.

When you are turning a screw, you put it on one of the numbers. A low number like 1 will provide low torque, while a high number will provide high torque.

It is also not a hammer drill, so you should not be using it to drill through concrete.
 
  #34  
Old 07-03-15, 05:56 AM
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Thanks for the explanation.

A guy on Youtube said you can use a regular drill to get through concrete if you use a concrete drill bit. He said to start slow and make a little indentation. Then to go full power.
 
  #35  
Old 07-03-15, 11:04 AM
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Might work if its very soft concrete... otherwise it will be a race of which will wear out first... your arm or your battery. Hammerdrills are much faster/easier for drilling in concrete. If you happen to hit a rock, a drill will just sit and spin, masonry bit or not.
 
  #36  
Old 07-03-15, 01:49 PM
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I have drilled through concrete many times using a masonry bit on a corded drill. But Xsleeper is right the drill bit will wear out quickly. It worth buying a cheap Harbor Freight hammer drill if you have an occasional use for it.
 
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