Interior doors: rough opening size questions

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  #1  
Old 07-27-15, 04:54 PM
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Interior doors: rough opening size questions

I think I messed up.

Helping my son out with his new home. It had dreadful interior doors we want to replace. Hollow core slabs (in poor shape) with steel door frames. Probably the original frames from when the home was built in the 50s-60s.

Anyway... I started ripping out the old doors and metal jambs. Simple enough.

Went out to get some solid core, 6-panel pre-hung doors.

Problem...

The rough openings are 25-25.25" on the 24" doors and 31-31.25" on the 30" doors. R.O. heights are 81" all around

All the pre-hung doors I can find are looking for a 32" RO (30" door) or 26" RO (24" door. (and and 82" RO height)

I know there is _some_ wiggle room. The height shouldn't be an issue, as I can cut down the jamb (and even the door if needed). It is the width I am worried about. It doesn't look like I will have enough room to fit the door in place. I think I will need to find about 1/2" more width to make this work.

What are my options? Should I consider ripping out a 2x4 on one side of the RO and replacing it with a 1x4? Are there standard size doors that will fit in the space I have available? We have 12 doors to replace.

It never occurred to me that the RO for a metal frame would be that much smaller than a wooden door frame.

Any help or suggestions are very much appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-27-15, 05:11 PM
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A lumber yard can order doors to fit any r/o but figure twice the price or more of a stock big box door. But since you need twelve of them, might be worth asking.

If the 2x4's are jacks and don't run all the way up to the top plate, swapping one for a 1x4 may be the easiest route. If you are real careful and cut any drywall nails first you may be able to get it out without destroying the drywall.

If that won't work, then I'd make a guide for a circ saw and rip the 2x4 in place from both sides, finishing up the cuts with a handsaw where the circ saw can't reach. Cut back the drywall first to avoid a dust storm.

Don't you just love how simple projects never are....
 
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Old 07-27-15, 05:14 PM
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Forgot to mention....at least consider if any of these doors are in bearing walls before you go skinnying up framing.
 
  #4  
Old 07-27-15, 06:32 PM
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Hi, 12 doors is a challenge because one fix won't work on all doors.I might try this:
You have a door with a 25 inch opening. The door is 24" jambs are 5/8 thick, door with 2 side jambs is 25-1/4. Buy a jamb kit and a slab door, cut 3/8 off each side of the door.
Now with 2 side jambs (1-1/4) and the door is 23-1/4 The Total is 24-1/2. You can fudge and cut a little more on the door to give you a little more room. You will have to mortise the hinges on the door and jamb and install the lock set. Hey you got 12 doors by the time you do number 12 you'll be an expert.take your time and make a story pole with the fist door.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
  #5  
Old 07-27-15, 07:40 PM
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If the rough openings are square and will fit the pre-hung units, you could install them with minimal (or no) shimming.

Slab doors would give you a bit more flexibility if it's possible to return the pre-hung ones, but you'll need to either get some jamb kits or a bunch of 1x6 boards and some stop trim. Solid core slabs should be fine if you need to cut them down 1/4" on either side before drilling/mortising for the hardware (just cut them a little proud and plane them to final dimension if you go that route). There's plenty of jigs out there for the mortising (I've got a milescraft set that works great and would save a ton of time doing 12 doors, although there are some fancier sets which are easier than mine to set up), provided you've got a fixed base router (palm router does great in this application, especially with a larger base plate) for the mortising and a table or track saw for cutting the door to size and a planer or belt sander for finishing the edges.
 
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Old 07-27-15, 07:49 PM
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If you have jack studs they make metal clips that can replace them on one or both sides. I'm not sure if they can be retrofit or not though. I think they may be more for new construction.
 
  #7  
Old 07-29-15, 11:50 AM
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Thanks much for all the replies. I tried to work with some pre-hung doors. Opening is just too small.

Cutting a little out of the jack studs might work for a few of the doors. In any event, cutting just isn't very feasible in this situation.

I looked around and found a local lumber yard. They are able to get me 6-panel, solid core, pre-hung doors to fit the rough openings I have. Yes, the cost is higher than the standard sized doors from the big box store. The ability to simply drop them into the existing opening is worth it (considering the alternatives). Plus, they deliver.

And yes... I do love it how "simple projects never are." Now, my son gets to learn the same thing. Nothing like the joys of home ownership.
 
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Old 07-29-15, 05:55 PM
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You will most likely find the doors will be higher quality as well, so, bonus!

When I am teaching or helping someone learn to do something, I always throw in a few mistakes so they don't get the idea things always go smoothly, and they learn how to deal with it. That's my story and I'm sticking to it....
 
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Old 07-30-15, 03:52 AM
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Some one sent me this note once. Thought it was appropriate. "Just because I give you advice doesn't mean I know more than you. It just means I have done more stupid stuff."
 
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Old 07-30-15, 04:01 AM
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Back when I was a teenager an older mechanic friend helped me rebuild the engine in my truck. After we got done he told me I was now an expert because I had made no mistakes, unlike himself [master mechanic] who had made numerous mistakes over the years Something I've never forgotten the more you do increases the odds you'll make a mistake but also gives you the wisdom on how to deal with them.

If you need any advice/tips on finishing the new doors/jambs - just ask
 
  #11  
Old 07-30-15, 05:31 AM
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It just means I have done more stupid stuff
Amen. One of the reasons I volunteer here is to try to save someone from making the same mistakes I did, or save about 10 trips to the hardware store.

In the early days I had some "pretty good" ideas that went south real quick. Ha. Maybe still do.
 
  #12  
Old 07-30-15, 09:37 AM
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Funny thing is the doors were the minor problem. I hired a company to install new windows (old ones were not good). On one wall we went to measure and noticed the wall moved.

Long story short, there is a 10ft section of wall that had a serious water problem many years ago. The "leak" was fixed, but the damage never corrected. Most of the wall had dry rot - amazing it was still standing. Most beams were dust.

I have a contractor doing some work in the house. He insisted the wall was a "small" project and I should do it myself. Didn't want to "take my money" for something so small. (I'm going to make him review my work and fix any problems anyway, especially since he has to tie in a new support beam to my wall.)

The wall is finally built, but again - nothing is ever easy. My first attempt at an exterior wall and building a temp wall to prop up the roof. Ended up aggravating an unrelated hand injury. The fun never ends.
 
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Old 07-30-15, 10:54 AM
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"Just because I give you advice doesn't mean I know more than you. It just means I have done more stupid stuff."
Yessiree!

My first major DIY was a complete engine rebuild on a GTO at 17 y/o. I picked the brain of the mechanics and machinists and it turned out good.
 
  #14  
Old 07-30-15, 01:48 PM
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Mine was pulling a Powerglide from a '55 Chevy from beneath the car. It hit my chest. No one told me they weighed 400 lbs Broke all 4 creeper wheels.
 
  #15  
Old 07-30-15, 07:51 PM
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Ouch! If the only things broken were the creeper wheels, you were very lucky.
 
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