Standard Jamb door for thick wall?

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Old 08-12-15, 08:05 AM
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Standard Jamb door for thick wall?

I am ordering some exterior doors. I have three different sizes of walls. My front entry door will be 7/16" OSB + 5.5" + 1.5" Furring + 1/2" or 5/8" Drywall. This will add up to about 8" thick. Can I order a standard 4-9/16" door jamb and add in ripped pine stock to extend the jamb? All I can think of is installing the door on the inner part of the wall which would cause problems with the pre made threshold not being large enough to cover the wood sill. If I set the door to line up the sill on the exterior, I have a door that would not hinge past 90 degrees because it's inside a tunnel essentially.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 09:53 AM
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Concidered ordering out opening doors?
 
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Old 08-12-15, 09:59 AM
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Talk to a lumber yard and order a door to fit your wall thickness. It is basically the same as a block building at 8" thick so it should not be a complete special order custom size so you should not get hit too hard in the pocket book.
 
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Old 08-12-15, 11:36 AM
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No way I would want an out swinging door for the front door of a house.

Completely agree with Czizzi. As you have already figured out, you don't put extension jambs on the hinge of a door jamb... swing problems and latch problems.

Stock doors will all have narrow sills. A special order door will have the correct width sill and jamb for your wall thickness.
 
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Old 08-23-15, 09:07 AM
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I have done some more researching into this. I went to a local yard to see some door samples and look up pricing.

here's my thoughts and plans:
The back patio door is a standard 6' wide sliding door (that I want to get at least).

Since it has no hinge, I will just get the standard door (made for 2x6 walls) and set it flush with the exterior of the house. This will leave 1.5" of interior jamb to custom create. No problems there, or at least they agreed it would be fine.

Back to the exterior entry doors --
It runs about $70 to $120 extra to get the extra 1.5" of jamb and threshold. I kept thinking a standard door would have to set to the exterior end similar to the patio door. BUT - is this true? Maybe I am just being a cheapskate here, but if I install a standard door flush to the interior, so the hinges have full open capability...could I install a piece of pine/oak along the sides and top to bring out the jamb, and then install the exterior screen door into that or the studs depending on the door? My only trouble I see with this is the bottom threshold won't extend to the edge of the house but instead stop 1.5" short. Does this sound stupid altogether? Perhaps there is not any solution besides ordering a the extra cost extension.
 
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Old 08-23-15, 09:51 AM
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With new construction you can do whatever you like with the sliding door, since it is always installed to the exterior, the difference is always made up with an interior jamb, and the floor covering is extended to meet the door, wherever it may be. The problem arises on a remodel when you have a narrower door than what was there before and it leaves a 2" gap where the narrow door no longer meets the existing tile or carpet. Surprise, you can't always do both!

On exterior entry doors, the advice you have already received still applies. You do not usually want to extend the jambs, either inside or out.

On the rest of the doors, an interior extension makes problems with the door swinging back, and with the strike plate on the latch side. Unless you don't mind getting marks on your trim where the latch slides across it.

On the exterior, the door HAS TO HAVE a sill nose that is long enough to extend out over the siding or deck below, or over the edge of the slab, or it creates problems. The front of the sill nose should act like a drip edge over the opening, and the grade should be lower below the sill nose to prevent any water from blowing back under the door. A minimum of 2" is recommended, but that often gets fudged closer because many people want it to be flush which is just not smart.

Order the doors to fit the exact wall thickness as Czizzi mentioned and you won't have any problems. Do it your way and you will surely wish that your sills were wider. The sills have to be long enough for the storm door sweep to hit on them. Extend the jambs and brickmould out farther than the sill and your storm door bottom expander will have nothing to sweep on.

The only way to cheap out is to be sure you are getting a door that has an optional sill nose extension kit, and DIY. By doing that you could get a standard 2x6 door, maybe with a 2" sill nose extension... and make your own jamb extensions as needed. Problem with that will be that the exterior finish on your door jamb will not match the finish on the extension. If you have primed doors that may not be a big deal, but if you have a nice coating, like an Endura prefinished jamb, your homemade extension jamb will be a maintenance problem.
 
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Old 08-23-15, 10:56 AM
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Hey Sleeper, thanks for the info.

I am trying to think what exact thickness I would need if I did order the doors custom made. I've tried finding those sill extensions you speak of on Menards website but there is not really much info. I wonder...are they sloped, and the extension is further sloped down...or are those sills normally fairly level and an extension wouldn't mess that up - so that they can be added without issue.

I was wondering about using some L aluminum flashing used for decks or deck ledgers on it's side that would wrap the lumber and then using a solid wood sill that is beveled for the entire sill to create the desired depth that would reach the screendoor sweep strip on bottom.

I will have 1/2" Drywall, 1.5" Furring, 5.5" 2x6 Stud, 7/16" OSB, House Wrap, and Vinyl siding. I'm figuring everything but the siding for the door thickness to give the door manufacture in the past figures.
 
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Old 08-23-15, 11:26 AM
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Mastercraft may not offer the size you need, I don't know much about Menard doors, from what I see on their website they just have the kit to change a 4 9/16 into a 6 9/16.

Don't know where u r located but you can get good doors at Builders or Millard in Omaha. Or look the Thermatru pdf here. https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sour...WjLJHA9QhB_PYQ

You will see one piece sills are available rather than extensions... or a wide sill plus an extension. The salesman should be able to price the door you need. Does sound like 8" wall thickness. What's the 1 1/2" furring? Foam?
 
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Old 08-25-15, 06:45 AM
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Also located in Nebraska.

So if I found a threshold from thermatru that is the depth I need, what are the negatives/cons of building out the jamb (exterior side) myself with oak or pine stock if I get a 6 9/16 door? The gap where they butt up would be caulked, and painted, so I don't see much wrong there. Am I overlooking more things?

The 1.5" is furring strips to allow my 7" mineral wool insulation to fit
 
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Old 08-25-15, 04:13 PM
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If you reread the last part of post 6, I tried to answer that. Most jambs nowdays will be maintenance free or have a coating on them. Anything you add will need to be painted, unless you use pvc. Also you would need 2 pieces... 1/2" lined up with existing jamb and 1" offset 1/2" for the storm door. Not one piece that's 1 1/2".

And I wouldn't recommend oak. Pvc would be best.
 
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Old 08-26-15, 10:03 PM
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Ahh, right. I did not think about the fact the screen door actually rests against to nosing of the typical manufactured door sill/threshold. I was picturing it on the same plane as the main door's threshold.

Got one door for the basement with a lesser jamb and threshold to see how it works down there. I figured being on concrete I can't screw it up like I can with wood exposed on the main floor level with wood framing to be exposed.
 
 

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