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What type of composite shims?


AlexH's Avatar
Member

Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 740
CAL

09-06-15, 12:26 PM   #1  
What type of composite shims?

Hi,

What type of shims are the easiest to use on a door install with nailing fins.

I don't see how the tapered shims would work if you can't access both sides of the jamb.

I see Silverline U shaped shims on Amazon, pack of 100, 1-6mm thickness, flat.
Also Handi Shims are square with holes.

Should the hinge screw go through the shim? I would think so or it might fall down.

Thanks


Last edited by AlexH; 09-06-15 at 12:47 PM.
 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 19,298
NE

09-06-15, 02:41 PM   #2  
Shims are usually inserted from the interior side only on a window/door with a flange. The tapered shims are put together in matching pairs that are roughly the right total thickness for the space...(facing opposite directions) then they are slid into the space. You can slip them just slightly to tighten them up... so using the right size shim for the job is required. (cut them to size as needed). Or if the gap is wide enough, sometimes you put two fat ones side by side and stick them in (thick side first), then put 2 thin ones side by side and slide them in (thin side first) and stack those 4 shims together until they get tight. But not too tight or you will bow the frame.

You can loosely tack the flange with 4 nails, but don't nail them tight since you may want to move the door as you plumb and shim it. You generally want to check the side jambs with a 78" long level as you do this in order to get the door perfectly plumb and then shim it straight. Ensure the sill is level, then start by shimming the 4 corners of the door... setting the hinge side first. After the door is completely set, you go back and cut the shims off so they don't stick out anywhere. And then secure the flange.

Tapered cedar shims are usually best. Horseshoe shims are usually used for commercial applications. Hinge screws should be very near the shims... or can go through them too.

 
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