Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Doors, Skylights and Windows
Reload this Page >

Removal of old 3-wide double hung window with sash weights

Removal of old 3-wide double hung window with sash weights

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-11-15, 12:59 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 32
Removal of old 3-wide double hung window with sash weights

Does anyone have experience with removal of these old wood windows. It appears that they are nailed in via a wooden flange that is about 3-4" wide. That flange is nailed directly to the studs. But there is no sheathing underneath this flange, the wood flange acts as the sheathing I guess. Hope this makes sense to someone. Does anyone have any ideas on how to proceed with removal and installation of new window. Once old window is removed there won't be any sheathing for the new window fin to attach to.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-11-15, 04:24 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
So we can see what you see, please post a couple of pictures. Difficult to advise in the dark. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...your-post.html
 
  #3  
Old 10-11-15, 04:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: USA
Posts: 4,185
Far more likely the old windows where attached to the studs with no nailing fins if there that old.
There was never any "sheathing" in the old days.
To get them out you need to remove the inside casing and outside trim. run a sawsall blade down the side of the window frame to cut off the nails.
 
  #4  
Old 10-12-15, 12:35 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 32
Window is actually not nailed through the jambs to the jack studs. There are weight pockets on either side prohibiting that. Behind the exterior trim are the wood nailing flanges. Has anyone done a full replacement on these types of old windows before? Here are a couple pics inside and outName:  1443307286278.jpg
Views: 1062
Size:  34.8 KBName:  1444061242330.jpg
Views: 804
Size:  31.0 KB
 
  #5  
Old 10-13-15, 07:32 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 32
Does anyone have any advice on removal and install
On these types of windows. Is it the norm to have to add plywood sheathing to the perimeter of the window as it wasn't there before
 
  #6  
Old 10-14-15, 03:30 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 32
Name:  1444770369568.jpg
Views: 265
Size:  29.1 KB
This is a picture of the left side of my 3-wide double hung unit with exterior trim removed. There is a storm window attached to the frame of my double hung. You can see this wooden frame that is nailed to the exterior sides of the studs. When the windows removed the frame will come with it and leave a void. Anyone have any advice on the best way to go about this?
 
  #7  
Old 10-14-15, 04:10 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: usa
Posts: 466
Standard procedure varied/varies in different geographical areas.

In your case, the sheathing and the "sub casing" are in the same plane. The stucco finish is applied to lath nailed onto the sheathing. The finish casing is applied over the sub casing. To get back to the face of a stud you would more than likely have to deal with removing some stucco, probably not something you want to do.

If you can leave the sub casing in place and add a stud to create the opening size you want for your window and then use the sub casing or a portion of it as the sheathing plane for your nailing fin on the new window...., this would be the best approach. Flashing everything well is where the problem will arise. You could then install a new finish casing over the flange and sub casing. That piece could be made of wood or a synthetic material not subject to decay.
 

Last edited by calvert; 10-14-15 at 04:27 AM.
  #8  
Old 10-14-15, 07:32 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 32
The "subcasing" that you're referring to is actually attached/integrated with the 3-wide double hung unit. This subcasing frames the entire 3-wide double hung and serves as the wood flange that holds the window in place. When I remove the window the "subcasing" will come with it. So I don't know how I could keep it??
 
  #9  
Old 10-14-15, 07:58 AM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: usa
Posts: 466
Sawzall or circ. saw cut it along the edge of the back of the jamb.

I believe you want to save as much of it as possible so you can attach a jack stud behind it and use the face of it as the sheathing plane to attach the fin of the new unit to.
 
  #10  
Old 10-14-15, 10:29 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: United States
Posts: 32
But there already is a jack stud behind it? Thats what the current windows are nailed to.
 
  #11  
Old 10-14-15, 04:06 PM
Member
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: usa
Posts: 466
If there is a weight pocket to the left and right sides of the unit, the subcasing has to be spanning that pocket before it hits the jack stud you have.

If you want to keep the piece to use as sheathing then cut it off at the back edge of the jamb or pull the nails that hold it to the jamb. Yo can then install another jack to take the place of the weight pocket and nail your new unit to that jack with the old sub casing acting as sheathing.

I have seen many applications with old window units and unless you have something really unique then I suspect what I am telling you will work. Perhaps post a better picture of the interior where you took off the side casing.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes