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Hanging first door, rubbing in middle on both sides, won't close

Hanging first door, rubbing in middle on both sides, won't close

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  #1  
Old 11-07-15, 11:26 AM
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Hanging first door, rubbing in middle on both sides, won't close

Trying to DIY a new interior door on a bedroom for the 1st time ever. After some initial chiseling and sanding, I hung it and it closed, was a little tight but closed. A few days later, now it's rubbing on the hinge side against the lip of the molding in the middle of the door, and on the other side where the lock pokes out the side, it's like it's too wide somehow so i can't close the door. If i'm standing outside the room and push in on the side in the middle of the door on the hinge side, that "eliminates" the rubbing on the hinge side in the middle.
Do i just keep sanding down both sides until it closes? or just in the middle? or is it something else?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-07-15, 11:35 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Did you just install a door slab or was it a prehung unit? Will the jamb push in?
 
  #3  
Old 11-07-15, 11:54 AM
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Thanks!
Just the slab, I think. Was just a door where I had to chisel out the things for the hinges myself. The jambs/sides are the ones there were there with the old door, feel pretty solid.
 
  #4  
Old 11-08-15, 03:46 AM
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Double check to make sure all the hinge screws are tight. You might also take a straightedge [4' level works well] to see if both the jamb and door edge are straight. I'm just a painter but the carpenters should be along later with more/better advice for you.
 
  #5  
Old 11-08-15, 03:58 AM
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What Marksr said. Make sure your opening is plumb and square. Installing prehung doors is pretty easy. They fit at the factory, they will fit in the opening. Hanging slabs can be a bear. Your house could have had settling issues prior to this causing the opening to become askew. It will need correcting before the door slab will fit. Don't sand too much on the door until you check out the frame into which it will be fitting. Let us know what you find.
 
  #6  
Old 11-08-15, 05:38 AM
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Kind of sounds like it is hitting/binding on the door stop. Often, you want to remove the door stop, install the door, then reinstall the door stop with the door closed... leaving just a bit of clearance between the door and stop.
 
  #7  
Old 11-08-15, 02:35 PM
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Thanks for all the replies!
Xsleeper, yeah, it's hitting the door stop on the hinge side in the middle. Then on the other side it's hitting as it gets to the little silver plate on the wall the lock part goes in to. Originally when I hung it it was only a little tight against that plate, so I made that a little deeper, put the plate back on, then could close it.
Chandler and Mark, I guess I'm finding out why the slab was $30 compared to the whole thing that was $200 more LOL I had to put dowels in the holes then I put in the shorter screws when I put the new hinges on. Do you think I need to replace all the screws with longer ones or something? I'm far from a handy man, but I can usually follow non-handyman worded instructions ok, so appreciate the help here. The other reason I went for the slab was because I was afraid if I got the whole prehung thing, I'd really be out of my league trying to tear the old one out and put the new one in.
 
  #8  
Old 11-09-15, 03:32 AM
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Longer screws don't hurt but as long as the original screws are still tight - that part should be ok. Nothing wrong with just replacing the slab although some feel like it's more work.
 
  #9  
Old 11-09-15, 05:18 PM
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Hi, Sounds like you have 2 problems. Fix the lock side first. Is the strike plate flush with the door Jamb?
If not fix that, if it is flush I would take a 2x4 about a foot long or better center the 2 inch side over the strike plat and wack it with a hammer then try the door if it moved put longer screws in the strike plate. Try it a few times most newbees don' want to hurt the 2x4.
If that fails remove the door and plane or sand the hinge side. DO NOT SAND DOWN THE LOCK SIDE YOU CAN'T CHANGE THE BACK SET. Now fix the door where it hits the stop. you have to move the hinges. This hard to explain but close the door looking at the problem pretend you push the door away from the stop. that will tell you that you that you have to move the hinges on the door toward the side of the door you were pushing. You may have to move the hinges about 1/8 inch. Also depending on how much you sanded 0ff you may have to set the hinges flush with the door. You will also have to plug the holes for the hinges with some3/8 dowels and glue and re drill the holes. Just use the center hole in the hinges till you're done then put the rest of the screws in.

Attached is how I hang slab doors it may help.

Good Luck Woodbutcher




On your new door decide what is the top of the door. Example on a six panel door the small panels go to the top. On a slab door the top may be marked if it isn’t then it will make no difference.
I have hung about 200 doors as a repair not construction. I will try to help you as best as I can.
With your old door in place check the fit. Most fits are OK. Fit is the reveal on the top bottom and sides of the door. With the old door still in place mark it top and back. The back is the side with the hinge pins. Mark the new door top and back this is for your reference it is very easy to get turned around doing this. Pull the pins on the old door and remove all the hardware including the hinge leafs. Do not remove hinge leafs on the door jamb. Measure the old door and cut the new one to that length be careful not to splinter the new door, score the door or clamp a piece of scrap wood on the side where the saw blade leaves the wood.
Set the old door on the side with the hinge mortise up. Line up the new door at the top of the old one. The back of one should be against the front of the other. With a combo square scribe the mortise of the old door to the new door. Now take one of the hinge leafs and trace the hinge between the mortise lines you just drew remember the pins on the hinge go to the back of the door. The hinge leaf is probably marked on the back side from paint or varnish, use this line to guide you when tracing the hinge. An interior door is 1 3/8”The hinge will set about 1 1/4” across the door. Use a router to cut out the mortise if you use a chisel be careful cut only across the grain of the door style or you will split it.
Install the leafs on the new door with only one screw on each leaf make sure to drill a pilot hole for the screw or you WILL SPLIT the door. If the door has 3 hinges , leave the middle one off until you fit the door.
Place the new door in the jamb put the top pin in first then the bottom pin, you may have to adjust the bottom leaf a little tap it up or down to make it fit. That’s why I use only one screw at first. With both pins installed, drill your pilot holes and put in the rest of screws in the top and bottom hinges.
Put a screw on the front of the door where the knob will go, you need the screw to pull the door closed so you can mark the door where it hits the jamb. Remove the strike plate off the door jamb. With a pencil mark the door where it hits the jamb. Remove the door and plane down to the line, take your time. You may have to mark the door 2 or 3 times to get the fit.
With a pencil, mark on the back side door casing, the center of the hole located on the door jamb used for the door lock Close the door and transfer the mark to the door. With a combo square use that mark to scribe a line on both sides of door about 3” long and across the style.
Now find the back set of the lock you are using. A new lock will tell you, if you use the old lock, measure the old door from the edge to the center of the hole. 2 3/8” and 2 3/4 are common sizes. Measure also the size of the hole you will need 2 1/8’’is common.
If the back set is 2 3/8. On the line you drew on the door make a mark 2 3/8 on each side of the door. If the hole is 2 1/8, use a 2 1/8 hole saw, cut half way through the door and finish the cut from the other side do not plunge straight through you will splinter the door. Mark the center of style and drill a hole to fit the door latch use a small as possible hole to fit the latch you don’t have much room to spare. Some latches need to be mortised to fit if this is the case put the latch in the hole and trace the face of it then remove the needed amount of wood and install it. Remember to drill pilot holes. Install the lockset and the third hinge if needed. Now wasn’t that easy?

Good Luck, Woodbutcher
 
  #10  
Old 11-14-15, 08:06 AM
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Thanks guys.
Woodbutcher, the strike plate is flush with the jamb, even if I take the strike plate off, the door still won't close, so not sure if the 2x4 and hammer thing will work, or should I still try that?
So on the hinge side, do I sand from top to bottom, or just in the middle part which seems to be where all my problems are?
When you say move the hinges, are you talking like moving them up for down and eighth of an inch up or down? Then how would i fill in the 1/8in gap on the door remaining from the hinge's old location.
I already had to do the dowel/glue thing when I took the old slab off before the holes were so screwed up, so at least I know how to do that part LOL
 
  #11  
Old 11-14-15, 08:15 AM
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Take the door stop off the hinge side. See if it closes.
 
  #12  
Old 11-14-15, 09:42 AM
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It sounds like the jamb has a belly in the middle by the strike plate. If this is a newer house with light 2 1/2" casing (moulding around the opening) and a thin 3/4" jamb, I think the easiest solution, in your case, would be to remove the casing and re-shim the jamb straight in the middle. This may sound drastic to you but if you don't have the tools to fit the door (hand plane or electric plane), you might be playing with this and sanding and re-mortising the hinges for a long time and never get a decent fit or look. Even if you get it to "just close", it will stick next summer or if you paint it. That said, I am assuming the hinge plates are mortised flush in the door and jamb and that you have two hinges not three. If three, remove the middle one and see what happens. One other trick you might try. Cut some strips of thin cardboard, like a cereal box, about 1/4"X length of the hinge plate. Loosen the hinge plate on the jamb and slip 2 or 3 under the plate on the door stop side. This will pull the door away from the lock side a bit.
 
  #13  
Old 11-14-15, 02:07 PM
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If I push the door in a bit in the middle on the hinge side, it doesn't hit the stop but even then it won't close on the lock side.
I think for now I'd rather stick with just messing with the slab and hinges, before i get even deeper into tearing up the other parts. At least a slab and hinges are cheap, and this is turning into a disaster for me as you can tell
You're right, 2 hinges. So I cut up a cereal box and put it under the hinges on the jamb, not on the door? Won't that push the door out more toward the lock side since it's thicker/sticking out further on that side now? Sorry, just trying to understand here before I make this even worse.
 
  #14  
Old 11-14-15, 02:20 PM
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The cardboard strips should be about 1/4" wide to fit between the innermost screws on the hinge and the edge of the jamb hinge leaf closest to the stop. What you are doing is tilting the hinge knuckle away from the lock. The rubbing on the doorstop is an easy fix. Pry it off, close the door (if you can) and reinstall it about 1/16" away from the door.
 
  #15  
Old 11-14-15, 06:23 PM
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Door slabs almost always come with a bevel on both sides of the door. Did you notice this when you mortised your hinges, and is the door turned the right way or is it backwards? The bevel allows a bit of clearance as the door is opened and shut.

If the door doesn't have a bevel, it probably should have one. If the door is bevelled and you have the bevel turned opposite, its going to cause problems.
 
  #16  
Old 11-15-15, 11:59 AM
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toolman, so i'm only putting the cardboard under the hinge behind one of the screws, or all three of them (the whole hinge)? For the rubbing on the lock side, even if I take that plate off the jamb, it still doesn't close.
XSleeper, didn't notice a bevel, but didn't really look for one either as I didn't know what that was until I just googled it. but how do i even tell if it has a bevel now, or would i have screwed that up when I was sanding down the hinge side if it's on both sides?
I think I put it the right way, the pattern design is different on the top of the door than the bottom, and the hole for the handle was already cut on the slab.
 
  #17  
Old 11-15-15, 12:47 PM
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It would be like D57 in the link below.

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/i...kbaSPvToiRA23w

If you put a square on the door, you should be able to see if it's beveled or not.
 
  #18  
Old 11-15-15, 01:51 PM
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I think it is beveled, as I do see a little gap on the lock side at the top using a square. Is that where I should see it?
 
  #19  
Old 11-15-15, 05:36 PM
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Well, if you are on a ladder looking down at the top of the door, the bevel (which allows more clearance on that side as the door closes) should be toward the jamb as the door closes.

Basically when there is a 2 degree bevel, the inside of the door would measure like 31 5/8" across, while the opposite side might be 31 3/4". The bevel creates a bit more clearance as the door closes. So if you would have happened to have overlooked that when you mortise the hinges, the door could have been hung backwards... where the bevel would not give you the extra 1/8" of clearance you need on the leading edge of the door.

Either way, it sounds like a power planer or belt sander would quickly fix your clearance problem.
 
  #20  
Old 11-16-15, 08:41 AM
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Are power planer or belt sanders expensive? I've been hand sanding so far, and that's getting old quick
But do I sand just in the middle on the hinge side? or do I also have to sand where the lock sticks out since it's rubbing there as well?
At this point, I'm so confused, as you can probably tell.
 
  #21  
Old 11-16-15, 08:55 AM
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You have to take maybe 1/8" off the entire hinge side top to bottom and re-mortise the hinges. Your best bet may be to take the door to your local lumberyard and have them run it over a jointer or big table saw. If the slab wasn't already drilled for the lock, you could take that area down but you can't do that now. As far as rubbing on the doorstop, don't try to sand that area, move the stop out as advised in earlier posts.
 
  #22  
Old 11-16-15, 09:10 AM
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ok, so sand the entire hinge side down a bit, then re-chisel the holes for the hinges so they are again flush with the side.
So you're saying take the doorstop that's part of the frame/wall off somehow on the lock side? or you talking about where it's rubbing against the doorstop on the hinge side which I'm supposed to sand down now?
 
  #23  
Old 11-16-15, 11:54 AM
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Is the door stop part of the jamb [like many split jambs] or is it a separate piece of wood? Not sure there is a good way to remove the stop if it's one piece with the jamb.
 
  #24  
Old 11-16-15, 01:35 PM
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I'm not sure what it is, it's all covered in layers of paint, is there a way to tell without tearing it all apart?
OK, I got a belt sander and sanded down the side, re-chiseled the holes for the hinges, and hung the door. I think I'm making progress but who knows. Now if from the outside of the room, if I push in on the middle with my hand and by the bottom hinge with my foot, the door actually closes. Prior to the belt sander I couldn't get it to close no matter what.
Does that mean one or both of my hinges are off in some way?
I think I'm getting closer!!
 
  #25  
Old 11-16-15, 02:02 PM
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One other thing I just noticed, from inside the room where the door almost closes, the gap at the top hinge and middle on the hinge side appear to be the same size, but it's tighter by the bottom hinge.
 
  #26  
Old 11-17-15, 12:42 PM
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Hi, Take a credit card, close the door and slide the credit card between the jamb and door it should move freely all around the door if it doesn't sand the door where its tight. Don't sand the door by the lockset that that can't be changed.
Door stop.
The door has to be moved away from the stop.
You can move the hinges on the jamb away from the door stop.
Or you can move the hinges on the door. This is hard to explain but easy to do. Some things are like that. Close the door put an X on the door by where the hinge is. Now open the door you will have to move the edge of the hinge toward the X. The distance from edge of the door by the X to the edge of the leaf on the hinge should be 1/8 inch.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 

Last edited by Woodbutcher; 11-17-15 at 12:46 PM. Reason: unclear
  #27  
Old 11-17-15, 01:02 PM
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Hi Woodbutcher. OK, I'll just sand down on the hinge side in the middle and bottom where it's rubbing, avoiding the hinge areas. Were a few spots where the credit card went in but was tight.
So for the door stop thing, if the sanding above doesn't fix it, am I really just nudging the hinges that are on the jamb about an eighth of an inch away from the stops? So I just need to move them a bit, drill some new holes, then screw them in?
 
  #28  
Old 11-17-15, 06:14 PM
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Hi, Do not measure from the door stop to the hinge. Pull the pins on the hinges and remove the door.
Remove the screws on the hinge leafs on the door jamb. Move the hinge leafs back 1/8 inch (Two quarters measure an 1/8 inch). Reinstall hinges use one screw to hold them in place. Hang the door and give it a try if the door closes then fill the old hinge screw holes and install the hinge leaf. If the door still hits the stop move the hinge some more.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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