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how to fix damaged door ?


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02-29-16, 02:30 AM   #1  
how to fix damaged door ?

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Hello how would I fix the door ? Tried applying joint compound but with a sudden jolt to the door the compound comes off. Would using silicon work better then joint compound on top of it work better ?

 
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02-29-16, 02:51 AM   #2  
Can not tell much from that close up.
Is it a hollow core flat slab wooden interior door?

 
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02-29-16, 02:58 AM   #3  
Back up and take a picture from a little further out. We can't tell what that is.

 
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02-29-16, 03:52 AM   #4  
Ya, a pic from further back would be nice.
Assuming it is a hollow core door it would be best to replace it, they aren't that expensive here in the USA. If you must patch it, drilling some small holes in the damaged area will help the filler hold on better. Did you sand the paint any before applying the j/c?


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03-01-16, 04:32 AM   #5  
Here you go thanks. The door is a hallow type door. I really don't know much more than that. Name:  IMG_20160301_020448.jpg
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03-01-16, 05:13 AM   #6  
Here in the states you can buy a new prehung door like that for about $65 or just the slab [door only] for less than $30. While there are things you can do to help a patch adhere it will always be subject to damage if abused any.


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03-01-16, 07:13 PM   #7  
Hello marksr.

Thank you for the response. I really do not wish to replace the door. Actually someone else had used joint compound or spackle on the damaged area but a unfortunate jolt to the door caused the patched area to flake/chip away/off. So I just gave it a a quick sand then tried joint compound but the compound won't stay once dried and the door is given a sudden bump/jolt.

I'm not sure what you mean by drilling some holes around the damaged area ? I need a way of keeping the crack area from moving so that once the j/c is applied the repair should stick even when the door is exposed to a sudden bump or jolt or slam.

 
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03-01-16, 07:43 PM   #8  
I wouldn't use joint compound. I would use Bondo or Snow White auto body filler. Remove all the JC and sand to bare wood in the area of the. After it is dry the Bondo can be sanded. If the dings are deep you may want to do it in layers. First just a thin layer over the whole area. Let harden then fill the rest of the way.
I'm not sure what you mean by drilling some holes around the damaged area
Imagine a circle around the damage a half inch bigger. Drill a few 1/8" holes in the imaginary circle.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
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03-02-16, 02:48 AM   #9  
Bondo or a setting compound like Durabond will adhere and be stronger than regular j/c. Applying a thin layer of j/c over the dried bondo will make easier to sand down to a nice finish. Drilling little holes in the area to be patched gives the filler more area to attach to [pushed into the holes]


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07-26-16, 11:27 AM   #10  
Bondo 170g Body Filler Single Use.

How does the product work once open ? I mean can I use this single use jar to make two applications ? Fist one let it cure and then sand and than apply second coat or layer and then let cure and then sand . So basically can I open the jar and use 1/2 plus the hardener and then use it again for the second layer or coat ? Or once the jar is opened it can only be used once because the jar contents will cure once exposed to the air ?

Or is there a different variation of the Bondo or a different brand product that will allow me to apply 2-3 coats in order to get the damaged area patched just right ?

 
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07-26-16, 11:43 AM   #11  
While as far as I know I've never used that particular product you should be able to mix it in part and use it, then mix more at a later date. You can't introduce any of the mixed product back into the can as that will make it all set. As long as the can is sealed well it should keep for months.


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07-26-16, 02:42 PM   #12  
@Thanks MarkSR. Do you think that using Bondo on filling the door hinges in my other post would be better than using Wood Filler which will require more coats and more time to dry several hours where Bondo will dry in 30 minutes ? Also since the door hinges are sitting vertically will the Bondo or auto filler stick in the door hinge areas when applied without leaking outside the hinge filled areas ?

 
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07-26-16, 03:00 PM   #13  
Either should work equally well. Whether or not the filler will seep outside of the recessed area for the hinge depends on how you apply it. I'd slap it on, smooth it out and then take a putty knife or straight edge to cut the edge nice and clean while it's still soft.


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07-26-16, 06:50 PM   #14  
Last question would it be acceptable to use just joint compound or spackle for the door hinges ?

 
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07-26-16, 07:23 PM   #15  
Spackle and joint compound is more likely to crumble then Bondo.


I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you.

 
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07-27-16, 03:20 AM   #16  
Spackle is for minor repairs and has limits as to how wide or thick it can be applied. Joint compound will work but as Ray said it's not very strong. If I had to use a drywall product I'd use a setting compound like Durabond as it dries a lot tougher.


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07-27-16, 05:45 PM   #17  
@Marksr and everyone thanks for the details.

 
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08-07-16, 11:15 PM   #18  
Would anyone know what is the best way to mix (hardener) bondo single use filler ? How can I measure the ratio (cream to hardener) exactly ?

Bondo Body Filler Single 6 fluid ounces 00260

 
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08-08-16, 03:53 AM   #19  
It doesn't need to be an exact mix. I've never mixed an entire can at once or measured out a partial can. As long as you get the mixture close it will be fine! Not enough hardener will make it take longer to dry, too much hardener will shorten the work time. Like most things the more you work with it the easier it becomes to eyeball it


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08-21-16, 07:48 AM   #20  
Can I buy a used door and hang it on a pre-existing door jamb ?

Also can I keep the same used door and use it another pre-existing door jamb ? One other question the door jamb is about 32 3/16" x 80 1/4" what size of door should I buy ?

 
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08-21-16, 07:57 AM   #21  
You can buy a "slab", mortise it for hinges and lockset, punch for a lockset and use it. Total PITA, but doable, when you can remove existing trim, install a new framed door and replace the trim quicker.

Edit: is this related to http://www.doityourself.com/forum/do...aged-door.html


Last edited by chandler; 08-21-16 at 03:35 PM.
 
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08-21-16, 10:10 AM   #22  
hello i have one more question to ask what sand paper grit should I use ? I have 120/150 but it is taking too much time to sand down the first application/layer.

 
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08-21-16, 10:17 AM   #23  
also would anyone comment on the best way to work the bondo auto filler into the door jamb doorknob section as shown in the photo ? thanksName:  IMG-20160821-00380.jpg
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08-21-16, 10:29 AM   #24  
You can either use a drywall broad knife or a plastic bondo spreader to apply the bondo. IF you use a steel blade you must clean the bondo off the blade before it dries!!

What grit sandpaper to use often depends on how well the filler was applied. Coarser grits will cut faster but leave sanding scratches, generally sanding again with a finer grit will remove those scratches. I'd probably start with 80 grit and finish up with 120 or 150 grit.


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08-21-16, 11:36 PM   #25  
chandler ah yes I would like to buy another door and replace the one that is damaged.

 
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08-21-16, 11:48 PM   #26  
thanks marksr. I think I'll go with the 80 grit and then use the 120 grit as you have suggested. thank you again.

 
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08-21-16, 11:53 PM   #27  
chandler or anyone what minimum size door (slab) would install in a door jamb that is 32 3/16" x 80 1/4" ? also what are the chances of finding a pre hung door that has had its hinges mortised and same for the door handle that has been cut out that will install perfectly without any modifications ? can a pre hung door have its door handle or locket that is already cut out be modified to fit a different door jamb ?

One last question what would be time and trouble of modifying the door jamb to fit a used pre hung door ?


Last edited by Victor43; 08-22-16 at 12:16 AM.
 
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08-22-16, 03:17 AM   #28  
A 2-8 x 6-8 door (32"x80") will fit fine. Now I am assuming you are measuring the door size and not the rough opening size. A prehung door will have the mortises cut, the punch made for the door knob and the mortise for the latch, so it is too easy. You realize you will be removing the trim, door and the casing in the hole in order to install a prehung door, right?

 
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08-22-16, 03:44 AM   #29  
@chander the door jamb that is 32 3/16" x 80 1/4" that I measured was the inside measurements of where the door sits not of the actual door or what I thought was called the door jamb ? The trim you mean is the door stopper strip that goes all the way around the door and stops the door when completely closed. Same question what exactly is the "casing" ?

 
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08-22-16, 04:15 AM   #30  
Casing is the trim that goes on both sides of the door jamb, it hides the gap between the jamb and the wall. You have similar looking trim doing the same thing on your windows. The door, casing and jamb get removed if you install a prehung. Once you've removed the casing you can use a sawsall to cut the nails between the jamb and the stud. Once the nails are cut the jamb should easily come out.


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08-23-16, 11:17 PM   #31  
@marksr thanks. But can you not just modify the door instead and mortised the new locations for the hinges over top of the old ones and the same for the cut out for the door knob assembly ? This is assuming that the door is square all the way around and the door fits the opening perfectly. Also would having to remove the door jamb be needed in order to mortised the new hinge and door knob locations on the new door jamb ?

 
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08-24-16, 03:23 AM   #32  
would having to remove the door jamb be needed in order to mortised the new hinge and door knob locations on the new door jamb ?
I'm confused why would you remove a new jamb?
You can cut a hinge mortise with a chisel on a jamb that is installed.
When installing a new jamb you'd shim as needed to make sure everything is level and plumb.


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08-24-16, 10:41 AM   #33  
marksr you said in a previous post the following "The door, casing and jamb get removed if you install a pre hung." does this not mean in order to hang the new already pre hung door the jamb has to be removed no ?

 
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08-24-16, 01:13 PM   #34  
Yes, the prehung comes with a new jamb - that's why it's called a prehung
To install a prehung you need to remove the door, casing and jamb so you are down to the studs. Then it's just a matter of inserting the prehung, making sure it's level/plumb, shimming as needed and nail in place.


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08-24-16, 01:14 PM   #35  
I think it is time for you to go to the store and look at a prehung door to familiarize yourself with terminology. If you remove the trim (case) molding from both sides of the door jamb, cut the nails between the jamb and the framing, remove the door jamb, your new prehung door will fit perfectly in the opening, requiring shimming, of course to make it square in the opening.

Edit: Mark is one nano second ahead of me.

 
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08-27-16, 09:55 PM   #36  
Can anyone tell me why after applying a few layers of Bondo does the surface of the layer appear to be somewhat rough and not smooth ? This is after sanding. If I apply primer and paint the surface will still look rough will it not ? Can I apply a thin layer of joint compound over the bondo ?

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08-28-16, 02:57 AM   #37  
The bondo should sand to a smooth surface. Auto body work generally has the bondo sanded smooth and then primed. Occasionally a thin layer of spot putty will be applied over the primer to fill areas that weren't filled sufficiently. It is possible to skim over the bondo with j/c.

How are you sanding the bondo? what grits of sandpaper are you using? You might not be sanding deep enough.


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08-29-16, 01:23 AM   #38  
marksr i used 40 grit initially and then moved to 80 grit. 120/150/180 does not do much or it will take much more time and effort to sand away the imperfections as seen in the picture

 
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08-29-16, 03:33 AM   #39  
Are you using a sanding block or electric sander? something to hold the paper flat


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08-30-16, 05:04 PM   #40  
marksr yes a sanding block.

 
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