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insulated glass unit for sidelite?


harum's Avatar
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06-09-16, 10:53 AM   #1  
insulated glass unit for sidelite?

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I want to replace the old door and the sidelite as in the photo. We already bought a new door which is the same size as the old one for the rough, stud-to-stud, opening of 40". The sidelite is not a part of the door. For the sidelite, rough opening is only 11" wide; the current single pane in the sidelite is 8-7/8" wide. I want to make my own window frame for the sidelite.

I was wondering if there were manufacturers which could make an 9" wide Insulated Glass Unit? Any suggestion or reference would be appreciated. Thanks, h.


Last edited by harum; 06-09-16 at 11:19 AM.
 
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Norm201's Avatar
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06-09-16, 11:16 AM   #2  
All windows are custom made. Give them the rough -in dimension and what type of design you want from a catalog and they will make it. I doubt they will make an IGU for your custom made rough-in framing. But, then again I'm not in the business or an expert.

 
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06-09-16, 11:18 AM   #3  
A glass shop will be able to order you an IGU of your custom size. You may not get a warranty if they don't do the installation.

There are also online suppliers; search for custom insulated glass unit.


Paul

Inside every small project is a big project waiting to slug you over the head and take all your money and time....

 
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06-09-16, 11:31 AM   #4  
Thanks Norm, I only found widths for IGUs starting from 11" (or 12" for custom sidelites) -- this will only work if I remove the 2"-by-4" stud between the door and the sidelite and fasten the sidelite directly to the door casing. It may work because the sidelite is on the lock side of the door (seen on the photo) -- not sure if removing the stud is a good idea though.

 
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06-09-16, 11:46 AM   #5  
Why not buy a door with attached side lite? You'll need to extend the top supporting section and double up the sidelite structure.

 
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06-09-16, 11:59 AM   #6  
Is replacing it an attempt to improve the energy efficiency, double vs single pane?
If energy is the concern, improving that area from single to double would save (back of hand estimate) $5 per year.

Bud

 
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06-09-16, 01:18 PM   #7  
Bud went right to the crux of the matter. All too often energy saving measures in existing homes have ZERO return on investment. This is especially true with windows where the amortization period can in some cases exceed forty years!

If it were my house I would simply do away with the sidelight and make it a properly insulated wall section.

 
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06-09-16, 01:28 PM   #8  
Normally I would agree with Furd and Bud, but in this case I think the return on investment is not the most important item to consider. In this case I think aesthetics plays an important roll. It's a deep alcove entrance and only that single edge for lighting. If it were me I would buy a new door with upper windows and built in side panel with windows . That would give the appearance of opening up the area and provide a lot more light. It's tough to put a price tag on what you like, what you have to live with and what you have to pay for. For me it would be part of the cost of having a better entrance and not care about return on investment. Plus you will get some insulating value compared to the single pane glass and a bit more security to boot.

 
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06-09-16, 02:28 PM   #9  
Norm, I agree with you concerning the aesthetics. My only point was with the capital costs versus the return on investment.

 
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06-09-16, 05:02 PM   #10  
Thanks for all the responses! I already have a new door; it doesn't come with a sidelite. Actually, yes, by replacing the sidelite I want to improve energy efficiency because the current one is falling apart, it has some rot at the bottom, warped due to exposure to the elements and isn't air-tight at all. Maybe just one pane sidelite would do, no need for IGU?. Filling in the sidelite space with a raised panel matching the door is an option too, except that it's going to be quite dark without it.

 
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06-09-16, 05:23 PM   #11  
Not my house but if it was mine I would have reframed that opening and installed the new door centered in the opening and used a door with a window in it.
Insulated windows can be custom made to any size, no way would I be trying to make the framing fit the opening.

 
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06-09-16, 06:13 PM   #12  
By code, the IGU needs to be tempered, laminated glass next to a door. They will order you any size you want but that may be narrow and if they say it might crack being so long and narrow but tell them you will take the risk regardless.

 
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