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Fixing poorly placed drilling of holes for door latch plate

Fixing poorly placed drilling of holes for door latch plate

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  #1  
Old 08-29-16, 09:03 AM
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Fixing poorly placed drilling of holes for door latch plate

Situation: a back door had an old mortise lock (metal box inside door) and a lock like the one shown at http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MzAwWDI3NA...5.JPG?set_id=2

We are upgrading the door with a new door knob to replace the old mortise lock and adding a deadbolt on the door. The door jamb has been damaged, probably due to past forced entry. We considered having a contractor repair the door jamb; I discussed the project with two contractors who leaned toward extensive replacing of door jamb structure on the latch side of the jamb. We decided to keep the cost down by installing a large entry door strike plate of the type shown at Shop Gatehouse Steel Entry Door Strike Plate at Lowes.com

The person who hastily installed the strike plate made some error in placement and some adjustment is needed. In other words, the screws were not drilled exactly where they should have been drilled. Drilling holes right next to existing holes is not feasible; it would, obviously, be hard to drill and would result in screws not holding well.

I thought of an idea. Perhaps larger holes could be drilled where the poorly placed screw holes were drilled and then a dowel rod of a diameter (for snug fit) the same as the drill bit could be cut to the proper length and fit in the hole and the dowel rod be glued in the hole. After the glue dried, carefully placed holes for the screws could be drilled; these holes would actually be drilled into the dowel rods embedded in the door jamb. I was wondering whether this technique has been used by others; I searched and found that it has. See Fixes for a Mis-Drilled Knob Hole

I'm just wondering about selection of diameter for the dowel rods. And, should I try to position the rod plugs cut for gluing into holes so that actual screw holes would be drilled somewhat near the center of the plugs?
 
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Old 08-29-16, 09:10 AM
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Perhaps larger holes could be drilled where the poorly placed screw holes were drilled and then a dowel rod of a diameter (for snug fit) the same as the drill bit could be cut to the proper length and fit in the hole and the dowel rod be glued in the hole.
Pretty standard practice. The dowel which might suffice right now without any further drilling is known as a golf tee.
 
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Old 08-29-16, 09:32 AM
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In other words, jamming a tee stem into the existing holes, if possible, right?
 
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Old 08-29-16, 10:00 AM
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Along with some wood glue, yes. Drill the hole larger if needed, so that you can just tap it in and cut it off.
 
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Old 08-29-16, 10:20 AM
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The long version is I was saying don't make extra work for yourself drilling if you can find something which fits now. I have a couple different size dowels in the garage for this purpose but my main supply for most holes is my dad's golf bag
 
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Old 08-29-16, 02:40 PM
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Thanks for the replies. I'm going to try the golf tee technique. I have white tees. I'm wondering whether they should be sanded a bit before using for this purpose.

Also, can new holes be drilled where the hole might overlap the wood in the golf tee and the surrounding wood? Is drilling in this situation more difficult than drilling where tbe wood is all the same type?
 
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Old 08-29-16, 02:48 PM
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Dont over think it. Drill a new pilot hole wherever it needs to go.
 
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Old 08-29-16, 03:12 PM
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Dont over think it. Drill a new pilot hole wherever it needs to go.
Yep, wood glue, golf tee, and hammer it home until the tee breaks off. Proceed to new hole placement.
 
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Old 08-29-16, 03:30 PM
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I will overthink it.
When drilling through the end grain of a dowel it is harder to center the hole than drilling through face grain, the bit will walk more.
I you need precise location of the pilot holes, use the new metal part as a Drill guide and drill using a bit like below:

Name:  vixbit.JPG
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The only name I know is VixBit, they are self-centering.
 
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Old 08-29-16, 03:32 PM
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Doesn't everyone drill their pilot holes with a self centering vix bit?
 
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Old 08-29-16, 03:56 PM
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I used to treat these like gold if that makes any sense. It was a never out item for cabinetry work.
An Automatic Punch works good also, anything to stop the bit from walking.
 
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Old 08-29-16, 06:55 PM
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They are a must for hinges and hardware such as strike plates.... anywhere the screw has to seat perfectly flat.
 
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Old 08-31-16, 07:07 AM
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Thanks everyone. Good to know about these self-centering bits. I found them at Lowe's. They have two sizes. So, if I think I need a size between those two sizes, I guess I could buy the smaller size self-centering bit, drill holes with it, and then use the next size larger regular bit to enlarge the same hole.
 
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