Repair dry rot in door jamb at threshold

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Old 10-01-16, 06:52 PM
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Repair dry rot in door jamb at threshold

I have an exterior, south facing door that gets exposed to sun and rain. The door jamb at the threshold has rotted out, through to the framing, leaving about a 1 1/2" 1" ragged hole. I've cut a new jamb to replace the rotted part, but need to know what's the best way to fill such a large hole. Thanks for your advice.
 
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Old 10-01-16, 07:09 PM
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I would probably use a Multimaster to turn that hole into a perfect shape... like a right triangle maybe. Cut out a piece of wood in the shape you want to use as a plug. Hold it against the jamb and trace around it... then cut the rotten edges out of the jamb. Insert your plug, glue and nail it to the rough opening, shim it if it's not thick enough... or rip it on a table saw if it's too thick. Then apply your stop, which will need to have a rabbet/kerf in it to accept the weatherstrip.
 
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Old 10-01-16, 08:16 PM
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Great advice, thanks. I'll have to look up a Multimaster. I always tell my wife every project requires a new tool!

UPDATE: I have a Dremel, but maybe I can get a new blade out of the project.
 
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Old 10-02-16, 05:07 AM
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Instead of using wood for the fix consider using PVC....it won't rot....AZEK is a good brand. When you make the cutout for the new piece cut a scarf joint instead of a butt joint along the top edge....this will shed water in the event of water intrusion.
 
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Old 10-02-16, 05:40 AM
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One point, you can just buy a piece of jamb, scarf cut it and the existing jamb, insert the new piece with glue and finish nails, and not have to deal with making a groove for the door seal.
 
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Old 10-02-16, 08:51 AM
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There are 2 part wood fillers that you mix. Fill the hole and nail in trim on top. I did this on a window sill 12 years ago and still good.
 
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Old 10-03-16, 07:54 PM
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@chandler, good idea! Your suggestion solves another issue I was trying to resolve: how to keep it from rotting again. I happen to have recently completed a 800 sq ft deck addition made using Azek, so I have some scraps around that fits the bill. I have already cut a piece of redwood to replace the jamb but Azek would do the job better.
 
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Old 10-03-16, 07:57 PM
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Water tight joint

@Chandler, the scarf cut is a good suggestion. I hadn't intended to completely remove the old jamb but it's obviously a worthwhile idea to make the joint more watertight.
 
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Old 10-03-16, 08:04 PM
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