Nail-Down Weatherstripping Question

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-08-17, 12:20 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Nail-Down Weatherstripping Question

This is our first winter in a new-to-us home built in 1875. We were surprised by the electric bills (heating is 100% electric baseboard), so I'm caulking and updating the weatherstripping. On the door that connects our mud room to our kitchen, there is metal weatherstripping with a small rubber seal that has been nailed down all around the perimeter of the doorway. I'm more familiar with the Frost King adhesive foam stripping, so I'm not sure why the previous owner would have used this metal, nail-down type. Is there a particular reason why? Should I keep it, or rip it out and just use the foam adhesive that I'm used to? As you can see in the second picture, the previous owner put the adhesive foam weatherstripping in as well (which I'm in the process of ripping out and replacing). The door is incredibly drafty even with both types, so I'm ready to replace whatever is necessary.

Thanks!

Name:  IMG_0473.jpg
Views: 175
Size:  24.3 KBName:  IMG_0475.jpg
Views: 199
Size:  36.9 KB
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-08-17, 12:26 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
The weatherstripping should end and start again in each corner rather than bending around it. The bulb type they used works, but it must be set properly to allow good even pressure all along the door edge. Using the foam works well, too, just make sure it isn't too dense so as to prevent the door from closing evenly along the entire length.
 
  #3  
Old 01-08-17, 12:28 PM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 17,763
You are familiar with stick on foam strips. Maybe the previous owner was familiar with nailed strips. It may be as simple as that. In general I find the rubber tube with a metal support weather stripping to be more durable but can be more difficult to install but the adhesive foam strips are easier to get to seal well.

You should look at the weather stripping that is there and see if it is doing it's job. If it's not sealing well you may be better off removing it and installing something else. I don't use the flexible type weatherstripping shown in your photo. I prefer the rigid type as it seems to seal better without requiring as many screws.

That leads me to mounting the strips. If you do install metal weather stripping most have slots for mounting. I prefer to use screws into the center of the slot so you have some room for adjustment and fine tuning.
 
  #4  
Old 01-08-17, 12:38 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,518
Those old doors either had no weatherstrip originally, or sometimes it was copper fin or a nail on felt weatherstrip. One of the best "add on" types of weatherstripping is a bulb type that is attached to an aluminum extrusion. Stays straight, easy to apply.

Similar to this: https://www.amazon.com/M-D-Building-...r+weatherstrip
 
  #5  
Old 01-08-17, 01:21 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Thanks for the help. I will check out the metal stripping's contact to see if it's effective. If it is, I'll keep it there. If it's not touching the door, I'll pull it off. Either way, I'm putting the felt adhesive style around it as a backup. Unfortunately, because the house/doors are so old and uneven, I have to "Frankenstein" my way around the door frame with several different widths and depths. Hopefully that doesn't make my work a whole lot less effective!
 
  #6  
Old 01-08-17, 06:35 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Follow-up Question:

Sorry, I haven't figured out how to edit my original post's title, otherwise I would have adjusted to show this follow-up question:

I put the thickest weather-stripping I could find in, and....it doesn't even touch the door in one corner. (My door is blue, the door frame is brown, and you can see the black of the foam with the white layer of paper backing from the weather stripping that doesn't touch the door.)

Name:  IMG_0477.jpg
Views: 168
Size:  20.4 KB
Name:  IMG_0479.jpg
Views: 152
Size:  21.8 KB
Name:  IMG_0480.jpg
Views: 144
Size:  46.6 KB

Other corners of the door are fine and have contact between the door and the weather stripping, but I'm unsure of what to do given the gap is so big in this particular corner. Should I try:

- Stacking foam weather-stripping on top of the layer I just added (this doesn't seem effective)?
- Nailing felt weather seal across the top/side of the door to fill the gap between the door and the weather seal (again, doesn't seem very effective)
- Trying to find weather stripping that is ticker than 7/16" (how thick do they make this stuff?)
- Taking the door off the hinges and re-setting the door to make it flush against the weather stripping (not sure if this is realistic)
- Something else?

Please help!
 
  #7  
Old 01-09-17, 04:15 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Close ups are confusing sometimes. If we can see the door top to bottom it may help. I feel you have either a warped door or the frame is skewed to prevent proper closure. At any rate, adding insulation really won't help until you correct what is causing the gap. Post a picture of the door frame itself. You may be missing a stop molding, but I can't tell.
 
  #8  
Old 01-09-17, 07:05 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Thanks for the reply. Yes, my pictures are confusing and they came in sideways, which didn't help. Let me try again with a picture of my door frame. This first picture was taken from our kitchen, looking at the door that leads to the mud room.
Name:  IMG_0481.jpg
Views: 103
Size:  41.4 KB

The pictures below are rotated correctly. I was taking it from inside the mud room looking up at the top left corner of the door and can clearly see that the weather stripping isn't contacting the door. Perhaps I need to shim the door hinge(s) to get this gap to close up? Never done that before, but I'm always up for a project!

Name:  IMG_0477.jpg
Views: 111
Size:  21.8 KB
Name:  IMG_0478.jpg
Views: 148
Size:  23.0 KB
Name:  IMG_0479.jpg
Views: 105
Size:  24.8 KB
 
  #9  
Old 01-09-17, 09:19 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 17,763
I would remove the flexible metal weather stripping that's there now and come back with the rigid type. Cut the new stripping to length. Then with the door closed you can shove it over until it contacts the door before screwing it in place. Do not nail it. Screws are nice because is you get them in the center of the slots you can loosen the screw and move the weather strip for fine tuning.
 
  #10  
Old 01-10-17, 06:44 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: USA
Posts: 28
Door Shimming or Adjusting Strike Plate?

I'm desperately trying to close up any gaps in our house, and the door from the kitchen to the mud room has been particularly troublesome. If I'm standing in the mudroom, the top left corner of the door doesn't have any contact with my weatherstripping, while it is making good contact in other parts of the door. Shimming seems to help make adjustments when the door is off-center like this:
Name:  DoorFrame1.png
Views: 203
Size:  3.8 KB

But I'm wondering if shimming will help if the problem is more with the depth of the door, like this (side view):
Name:  DoorFrame2.png
Views: 165
Size:  6.6 KB

If shimming won't help me, do I need to adjust the strike plate, (push it deeper back in the door frame) so that it contacts the weather stripping? If the door is very old and warped, is it best just to replace the door?

Here are pictures of the door and the gap in the weatherstripping:
Name:  1.jpg
Views: 186
Size:  41.4 KB
Name:  2.jpg
Views: 170
Size:  21.8 KB
Name:  3.jpg
Views: 216
Size:  24.8 KB
 
  #11  
Old 01-10-17, 07:11 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,174
If you can push on the door and it tightens up to the weather stripping then adjusting the strike plate will help. Putting shims under the bottom hinge will lift the door so it is more square to the hole.
 
  #12  
Old 01-10-17, 04:24 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
OK, I've merged these threads since they are both on the same subject dealing with the same door. No need to rehash the same information twice.
 
  #13  
Old 01-11-17, 06:34 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 17,763
To some extent you can adjust the weather stripping to accommodate a warped door. It just depends on how badly it's warped and if the door changes shape with the seasons.
 
  #14  
Old 01-11-17, 08:22 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,518
That's probably why they used that thin nail on gasket in the first place... to try to accommodate a warped door. I bet the stiff one I mentioned earlier would not work well at all if the door is that warped.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes