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Should this patio door threshold be caulked underneath?

Should this patio door threshold be caulked underneath?

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  #1  
Old 03-05-17, 04:46 PM
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Should this patio door threshold be caulked underneath?

In a heavy rain my girlfriend's carpet adjacent to the corner of the patio door frame gets wet; it's the darker area in the pic.

There's a sizable gap between the frame and the decking, as you can see by the leaf that I slipped underneath the frame.

At first I thought that might be for water to run out of the frame's drainage holes, but there aren't any; the moveable door's guide lips stop before the side frames so the water can run out there.

Also, there's no visible slope on the board underneath the frame.

Can someone tell if the frame is supposed to be caulked underneath?
 
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  #2  
Old 03-05-17, 04:54 PM
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Welcome to the forums. The thresold should have been installed with a generous amount of sealant under it. I would clean it up and apply OSI Quad sealant across the seam as a stopgap.
 
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Old 03-06-17, 11:20 AM
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Thanks, Larry.

Do you mean stopgap literally,which fits this situation, or until a better solution is implemented?

If the latter, what would that be?
 
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Old 03-06-17, 11:29 AM
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What Larry is saying I believe, is that if the door was not set in a bed of sealant, it was not installed correctly... the only solution (that does not involve removing and reinstalling the door) is to caulk the interior edge... which is not the "best" solution if the sill is wood... since it would allow the entire bottom of the door to get and remain wet. But its about all you can do. Doors subject to blow back can also be installed on a pan flashing. If the exterior grade, such as a sidewalk or patio, is the same level as the interior surface, this problem is exaserbated. Grade outside a door always needs to be below the bottom of the rough opening.

The other possibility is that water is entering the rough opening from the sides or top, and depending on what kind of siding you have, there may be other possible sources for the leak. If you remove the interior trim and the insulation on the sides of the door is wet, the leakage is occurring higher than you think.
 
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Old 03-06-17, 02:44 PM
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XSleeper,

> ...is to caulk the interior edge...

The carpet would need to be lifted to do that, or by "interior" do you mean underneath the bottom frame piece on the outside?
 
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Old 03-06-17, 02:57 PM
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Really, stopping the water from the outside is best, but if, as Brant said, you have a leak from siding or other parts higher up, sealing the front edge won't amount to much. I still would use a good quality sealant such as OSI Quad (which BTW is solvent based, so you will need a rag with a solvent to clean up messes) along that edge. Yes, you can lift up on the threshold and force some of the sealant under it. Not much as once you put pressure on the threshold it will all squish out.
 
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Old 03-06-17, 03:05 PM
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Correct... carpet needs to be lifted... the caulk on the inside edge acts like a dam so that if water does get to that point it can't go farther. Interior trim would be removed and a caulk dam would be placed on both ends of the door to dam up the rough opening and force water outside. A pan flashing would be better than caulk, but the door has to come out to install a pan flashing so it's not an option at this point.

If you caulk the outside edge of the sill, it can in "some cases" actually prevent water from draining and force it to run inside instead.
 
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Old 03-06-17, 10:01 PM
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It's possible the water is coming from above if there's a roof leak (tile).

I don't think it's at the top of the door frame, as it's under a roof overhang, nor the sides, which have wood trim that's caulked where it abuts the frame and plaster walls.

Nor from below the frame; the house is on a hill sloping away from the door and there's a couple feet of wall below the door before it meets the ground.

The easiest thing is to try sealing under the frame, so I'll try that first.

I'll jam some round foam gap filler underneath and caulk it at the bottom and sides, which will be easy to remove if the water is running down the wall on the inside.

Thanks, everyone.
 
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Old 03-14-17, 08:11 PM
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I suggest that there probably isnt a sillpan underneath the threshold. A sillpan is designed to prevent the threshold from attracting water. Replace the sillpan, install new threshold then buy some rustoleum neverwet, a super-hydrophobic paint that's clear coat and spray it on the door base and threshold.
Water will just bead off and not come in. Reapply the neverwet every couple of years.
 
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