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milkshoot dripping with condensation


janebench's Avatar
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03-07-17, 07:50 PM   #1  
milkshoot dripping with condensation

So, remember back in the day when people had little openings with doors (by their back doors of their homes) so that the milkman could open the door and put your milk in it? Well, my mom still has one and lately it is dripping with condensation whenever it gets cold out. Not raining - but cold out. Not sure how to approach this problem. It is on the outside wall by the back door. I'm including photos cause I'm guessing most people do not know what the milkshoot is. Second picture is the condensation coming from the top outside wall side. Any ideas how to rectify this problem?

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looking forward to hearing any ideas

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03-07-17, 08:10 PM   #2  
Several factors are at play. The milkshoot is likely metal, and metal is a good conductor... so when it's cold outside, the metal will be cold. Secondly, the humidity in the house is high. The cold metal is acting like a dehumidifier, and is wringing the moisture out of the air. Lower humidity, if possible. Third, if there is any air leaking out the "door" of this thing, it's going to make the above problem even worse. Caulk gaps as needed.

I'm surprised this is the first time you have experienced this.

 
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03-08-17, 03:20 AM   #3  
I don't know how feasible it would be on the outside but I'd remove the inside portion, insulate and patch the drywall .... assuming it's no longer being used for anything.

It's been a long long time since I've seen one but didn't they also have a door on the inside?


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03-08-17, 04:36 AM   #4  
Yes they usually had doors on the inside also.

This brings up a funny story. When I was kid (maybe 10 years old), I collected small animals, like many kids do. Snakes were one of my favorites. My mom did not like them and always yelled at me when I brought them home. So I decided to hide my "pet" in a jar and put him in the milk box. I put too large a hole in the top. The next morning I opened the box from inside the house and the snake was neatly coiled on top of the jar. Good thing I checked 1st before Mom did. However by that time the milk box was no longer in use.

 
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03-08-17, 03:41 PM   #5  
It started a year ago. She has just been putting towels in.

 
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03-08-17, 04:16 PM   #6  
Yeah i'd say something on the outside or inside needs to be caulked. If it started recently and nothing else unusual has changed. There is probably an air leak letting cold air in.

 
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03-15-17, 07:41 PM   #7  
xsleeper, I looked at the outside and it looks like maybe I can improve caulking. There is a thick layer of paint on it. How would I go about recaulking and what type? Do I have to remove paint first? thanks

 
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03-15-17, 08:11 PM   #8  
Best advice I can give is that if there is old caulking there, cut it out with a utility knife or chip it off with a chisel. (Sometimes you can just push the chisel with the palm of your hand.) Use any acrylic latex when the temperature is above 32F for 7 days... do NOT use silicone. Then after the paint has cured, paint over the caulking. You only need to scrape the paint if it's loose or chipping off.

Don't know where you shop, or I could maybe recommend something specific. Lowes? HD? Menards?

 
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03-16-17, 02:34 AM   #9  
I'm sure X meant to say 'after the caulk has cured'

If the paint has much sheen it's a good idea to hit with some sandpaper, nothing drastic - just scuffing up the gloss. I'd use a siliconized acrylic latex caulk - it's paintable.


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03-28-17, 01:35 PM   #10  
Thanks for the info. I shop at HD.

 
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