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Concrete under exterior door very wet and gets ice in winter


metallicviper's Avatar
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Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 4
CANADA

04-05-17, 08:22 AM   #1  
Concrete under exterior door very wet and gets ice in winter

Hello, I have two exterior doors and both sit on concrete. The concrete seems to be wet quite a bite and during winter frost appears (mold appears as well). I've checked the inside and outside, and i've recaulked and spray foamed any openings. The pictures attached are of one door, i dont have pictures of the other door. Please let me know if you have any suggestions as to why this is happening. Both doors do not have a storm door.

thanks!

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Marq1's Avatar
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Join Date: Sep 2016
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04-05-17, 08:54 AM   #2  
Is the door sitting on a flat pad that extends inside and out?

That is what it looks like and if correct then water is wicking inside through the concrete itself.

Usually the door is raised up and exterior concrete does not extend into the house.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
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NE

04-05-17, 11:46 AM   #3  
I think its simply because the pad outside is cold and uninsulated while the concrete inside is warm. Dont know that there is much you can do about it unless you break up the concrete outside and place foam insulation on the outside of the foundation under the door to isolate interior and exterior temperatures.

You should really have 1" minimum of drop at the edge of the pad... keeps water from blowing back under the door. A 1" piece of trim covers the gap and supports the sill nose.

 
XSleeper's Avatar
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04-05-17, 02:34 PM   #4  
Another possibility... if the door was not set into a bead of continuous sealant, a massive air leak would carry warm moist air out under the door where it would cause icing on the colder slab (that should be isolated with a thermal break from the pad inside) that is outside the door.

 
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