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Pocket Door Framing/Trim


ptmuldoon's Avatar
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NY

04-13-17, 08:43 AM   #1  
Pocket Door Framing/Trim

I am possibly leaning towards installing a pocket door as part of a basement finishing project. This will be used in dividing/creating a separate laundry room from the rest of the finished area.

Now, the 'backside' of the wall will not be a finished wall, with only sheet rock on the 'front side' finished area.

My question is what to you do for trim on the side the door closes against and latches to? Do you normally place sheet rock on at that 4" section of that 2x4? Or a finished piece of oak or painted wood?

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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04-13-17, 08:52 AM   #2  
Yes, its normally trimmed with a solid wood jamb on the "latch" side, shimmed plumb. The opposite side gets a split jamb nailed to the edge of the pocket door framing. You leave about 5/16" gap on each side of the door for play. The top split stop is attached with flush screws so that you can remove the stop on one side and adjust the door if needed.

 
ptmuldoon's Avatar
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04-14-17, 08:19 AM   #3  
Thanks XSleeper.

Possibly just 2 more questions as I work on thinking it thru and planning. Hoping to start the work in about 3 weeks.

As this pocket door would be going into a basement with 7 foot ceilings, I have read.

The bottom plates should be PT lumber to place on a concrete floor? (I hope!)

And that you can get away with also not using a top plate and screw/nail directly into the joists?

This is of course a non load bearing basement wall to just divide/separate a laundry vs a finished area.

This is likely the Pocket Door I will pickup at the local Big Orange BoxStore

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Builder-s...I430/100098025

 
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04-14-17, 08:45 AM   #4  
Yes, any wood fastened to concrete should be treated lumber.

You do need a top plate as a fire block between the vertical wall and the horizontal joist spaces. It also gives you support for the top edge of the sheetrock on the wall. Keep in mind that your pocket frame won't reach all the way to the joists, even with a 7 foot basement. You will need some framing above the door opening so you have support for the sheetrock.

That door frame looks fine, but you can also buy (perhaps not from HD) pocket door frame kits that include all the finish trim pieces, including the split jamb and solid jamb, in case that is of interest. Johnson hardware is one source for complete kits.

 
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04-14-17, 01:29 PM   #5  
Thanks.

I was hoping/preferring to go with a prebuilt door frame vs building one from a kit.

And yes, I already ran a top plate across the joists and will make sure all fire blocking is done before closing up the walls. My concern is that the pocket door frame says it is 84.75 inch tall. And I just measured from the bottom of the joist to floor and that is about 82.5. And about 81 from bottom of the top plate to the floor.

I had read elsewhere that you could install a pocket door frame directly to the joist, and I could then continue my top plate on either side of it. I think that would still meet code regarding fire blocking?

But can you trim a pocket door frame if necessary? Or am I being forced to build one from a kit?

And I think these pre-built pocket door frames should have a PT bottom plate on them.

 
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04-14-17, 03:17 PM   #6  
I just did this very same install recently! I also used a very similar frame (here's the one I have: https://www.menards.com/main/doors-w...58956234990417)

And it's definitely possible to trim them. They come in two pieces - the top part that supports the door hangars gets attached to the vertical part of the frame that the door slides into. So you can trim the wood on the vertical pocket piece before attaching the top piece. Depending on how much you need to cut down, you may need to trim metal as well. There are metal tracks that run inside the wood - I trimmed both the metal and wood and it wasn't a problem! Good luck!

 
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04-14-17, 05:21 PM   #7  
Yes, you can trim the frame if necessary (which means you will have to trim the door too).

To avoid having to replace the bottom frame pieces with pressure treated lumber, in most areas you are allowed to use sill sealer or similar product to separate untreated wood from the concrete. Treated lumber is preferred, but since you are buying a premade frame the sill sealer is an option.

You can mount the frame up tight against the joists and just run top plate for the rest of the wall. Just make sure it is level, shimming as needed, or the door may open or close by itself.

And watch the length of the sheetrock screws you use....too long and bad things happen.

 
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04-14-17, 05:49 PM   #8  
Thanks guys.

So, hopefully nothing overly 'complex'. But then again no plan ever survives contact.

Any recommendations on trimming the metal track and stud? I would want that cut as straight and level as possible. Got a recommended tool for the job?

 
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04-15-17, 08:36 PM   #9  
When I cut mine down, I used a sawzall to cut the metal and a circular saw to cut the wood - if you had the right blades, you might be able to use the skil saw for both. The critical part is just make sure the top is perfectly level or obviously the door won't hang well. But they were pretty easy to cut.

I cut mine 1" shorter than I needed and then put the frame on top of a 1" piece of treated lumber that's anchored to the concrete - it seems to have worked pretty well.

One word of caution on these pre-made frames - they're kind of cheaply put together. Mine only had staples in many spots, I added a few screws to make it more stable. On the finished side, I used 1" drywall screws - any longer and you risk going through the frame into where the door slides.

 
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