Bondo Question

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  #1  
Old 05-17-17, 02:44 PM
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Bondo Question

I learned to use Bondo for wood repairs on this forum many years ago and it has saved me many times. Today I went into HD for a new can and all they carry now is fiber reinforced, which is green colored. The old stuff was white/gray with white hardener. Does anyone have experience with the fiber product vs the old stuff?
 
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Old 05-17-17, 02:53 PM
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Oh, yes. I really like the green stuff. It turns brown once you mix the activator with it.
 
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Old 05-17-17, 03:41 PM
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I have used both the fibered and un-fibered. They mix and work very similarly. When stirring you'll probably notice the strininess of the fibers but they smooth down easily when applying it.
 
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Old 05-17-17, 03:48 PM
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If you want the normal type take a look at an auto parts store!
 
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Old 05-17-17, 06:19 PM
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I've tried it now. A little harder to apply smoothly and definitely harder to sand. I hope the fibers give more strength and durability. I am repairing a door that I would have rated scrap from rot. Customer wanted to repair, so here goes. Thanks for the input.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 12:09 AM
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The fiber stuff is great for rough cut trim or rough cedar fencing. Out here, lot's of rake and fascia boards are rough. I filled the damaged area and then schmeared a larger area with the bondo and smoothed it with a notched baseboard adhesive knife I had. No sanding required. After paint, you couldn't even see a repair.

Dunno if it's something I'd use as the final surface on a door though. Guess it depends on how grained or smooth the door is.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 02:41 AM
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I was surprised the first time I used it on a grained surface. Like Vic, I had planned on sanding it, but that would leave a smooth surface on a grained surrounding. It grained out very well and after painting it almost disappeared.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:21 AM
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I am currently working on smooth doors. It seems like this will be stronger in the huge deep fills (much rot) but takes more elbow grease to sand smooth.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 06:33 AM
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If need be you can apply a thin coat of joint compound over the repair for easier sanding. It's best to seal it with an oil base primer to insure moisture won't get to it.
 
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