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Interior door hinges have both a cap on the top and a cap on the bottom

Interior door hinges have both a cap on the top and a cap on the bottom

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  #1  
Old 05-26-17, 07:34 AM
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Interior door hinges have both a cap on the top and a cap on the bottom

Was planning on greasing down the door hinges since they sqeak but when I brought over my hammer and nailset to hit the pin out from the bottom of the hinges I realized every hinge had a cap on the bottom. (attached pic is an example)

Before I go further, does that bottom cap twist off with pliers, is it a cap or is it attached to the pin, etc?

I'm used to the bottom of the hinge being open and I can just place a nailset directly on the pin and hit it up and out from the bottom
 
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  #2  
Old 05-26-17, 07:42 AM
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Unless it is a high end hinge with screwed in caps you do the same as the top, drive a flat tip screwdriver between the hinge and cap then finish tapping it out.
 
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Old 05-26-17, 07:58 AM
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does that mean there's one pin and cap coming down into the hinge from the top and another pin and cap going up into the hinge from the bottom and they meet in the middle?
 
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Old 05-26-17, 08:07 AM
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No, the top cap is the head part of the pin. (like a nail or screw.)

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This bottom pin is threaded but most aren't. If the bottom cap is flat most likely it isn't threaded. You can remove the bottom cap and just drive the pin up. I usually just try using a flat tip screwdriver to tap the pin out and don't bother with the bottom cap unless the pin doesn't come easily.
 
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Old 05-26-17, 08:32 AM
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These aren't spring hinges by any chance?

The picture you posted shows a set screw (or pin?) in the middle knuckle. I have never seen that but I suppose it could be a security feature so the pin can't be removed without the door being open. If yours has a set screw and it's not a spring hinge, I'd try loosening the set screw.
 
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Old 05-26-17, 08:43 AM
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I just uploaded that picture as an example.
I think mine is the unthreaded version of the pic Ray shared.
I'll knock up the top with a hammer and chisel until the bottom cap falls off.
Thanks
 
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Old 05-26-17, 10:52 AM
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I'll knock up the top with a hammer and chisel until the bottom cap falls off.
You just made me cringe. I would never abuse my chisel that way. This is a job I buy Dollar Store flat tip screwdrivers for. The bottom cap as I wrote has to be driven off if not threaded.
Was planning on greasing down the door hinges
You don't grease, you oil. You don't remove. You knock the pin up a " or so and apply a couple of drops of light oil such as Three-in-1 oil then tap it back in. The oil will usually work its way down. (Do not use WD-40. It really isn't an oil.)
 
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Old 05-26-17, 10:58 AM
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I've always used a stiff blade putty knife. It works well and when I was working I always had one in my side pocket
 
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Old 05-26-17, 11:04 AM
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Yes, a stiff blade putty knife is a good choice. I just grew up using a screwdriver.
 
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Old 05-26-17, 01:52 PM
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I need to wrap my head around the need to dismantle the hinges for lubrication. Can you not use white lithium grease sprayed in the voids of the hinge at the pin to lubricate them? You're going through a lot of work to stop a squeak.
 
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Old 05-27-17, 05:31 AM
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A spray of silicone over the hinge joints works for me.
 
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Old 05-30-17, 06:43 AM
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My chisel has lasted decades and isn't going to be compromised by a measley door hinge.
One set of hinges appeared flat but it was only because the cap was ultra thin.
I use this as an opportunity to wipe down the rust/crud off the pins also I don't like the messiness of spraying.
I have a white lithium tube just for this purpose. I clean the pin, dip in the pin, slide it back in the hinge, and voilah. I did all 9 doors in about an hour
 
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Old 05-30-17, 12:52 PM
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As a carpenter the one thing you don't loan electricians is your nice wood chisels. They will cut rebar with it if they could.
 
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