Garage rear entrance door

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  #1  
Old 08-04-17, 11:00 AM
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Garage rear entrance door

There is nothing wrong with the door itself. The bottom of the frame & the wood under the saddle rotted from water damage. I have the saddle under control.

What's the trick to repair the bottom of the frame about 6" from the ground on both side?
 
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  #2  
Old 08-04-17, 11:10 AM
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If total replacement isn't an option, I'd cut out the bad and replace with new wood - primed on all sides prior to installation.
 
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Old 08-04-17, 06:07 PM
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There is no reason to replace the entire door & I plan to use new wood. The frame is one size in the middle & there is an inside & outside brick face molding which are different sizes. I can't cut just one piece of wood & mount it.
 
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Old 08-04-17, 06:17 PM
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If 6" of jamb is bad on each side I would get new jambs. If the sill and threshold were bad, that should really be repaired with the jambs... To change the jambs you have to pull the door. The sill and jambs are stapled together at the corners. The corner connections have to be strong or else when you slam the door or kick the sill everything moves around.

And if you are replacing 3 sides... you are only saving and reusing the top. I agree the whole jamb should probably go but your call.

Maybe if it was more clear how bad its rotted. Got any pics? I have some jamb repair pics online... I will try to find them.
 
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Old 08-04-17, 06:46 PM
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As I said, the sill is under control. I don't see any reason to replace the jams for 6" & the landlady doesn't see any reason either. I was thinking of using aluminum stock, maybe a wrap around thing.
 
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Old 08-04-17, 07:18 PM
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So you say. I dont know if this link still works but if it does, page thru the photos... this was the last major jamb repair I did.

http://s231.photobucket.com/user/the...?sort=3&page=1
 
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Old 08-04-17, 08:16 PM
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Well done but I was hoping to make the job simpler than that.
 
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Old 08-04-17, 08:42 PM
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It has been my experience over a lifetime that "simpler" generally means "cheaper" and that returning to do the job correctly is going to occur a lot sooner than just doing it correctly from the get-go.

Your call.
 
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Old 08-05-17, 04:31 AM
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I dont know why I keep deleting my replies... must be a glitch on my phone.

We didnt know it was a rental until just now so... Landlord = rental and rental usually = cheap, not quality so that's understandable.

If you have access to a metal brake maybe clad the whole door jamb.
 
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Old 08-05-17, 04:53 AM
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Some clarification.: The deal is that I work for the owner in return for her not to raise the rent. I've had a free labor deal with many owners, over the years. We both live at the same location. She is not a typical owner where she won't spend when it's needed. At the same time, there is no reason to replace the entire door or even the 2/3 of the frame. As I said, the saddle is under control. My guess was that someone had a "trick" that was unknown to me. Apparently, I was wrong.
 
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Old 08-05-17, 05:01 AM
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Instead of wood how about using PVC which won't rot. This area of a door frame is susceptible to rot most likely due to wicking water. Can't see the profile of your door molding but there is PVC brick mold. Big boxes are now carrying PVC.
 
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Old 08-05-17, 05:29 AM
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The water problem was repaired so it doesn't matter if I use wood or PVC. If I can cut one, I can cut the other. Since there is no "trick", I'll just have to take my time & do it piece by piece.
 
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Old 08-05-17, 05:37 AM
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When you add the new pieces a scarf joint will be better than a butt joint.
 
  #14  
Old 08-05-17, 10:22 AM
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I usually make a butt joint because it's easier ... at least for me. I prime all 6 sides and when I install the dutchman I caulk as I'm installing so the entire depth of the joint gets sealed.
 
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