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Significant gap at top & sides of new window frame

Significant gap at top & sides of new window frame

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  #1  
Old 09-27-17, 06:05 PM
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Significant gap at top & sides of new window frame

Part of our bathroom remodel is a new window- apparently they ordered a window that was slightly smaller than the framing and from the looks of it they simply screwed it in on horizontal center and flush at the bottom (see pics). Is it normal to do it like this without shims? I would be worried if any screw were over tightened by any amount it would start to torque/warp the window frame?

Also, what is the best way to seal those gaps? The whole reason we got casement was to reduce noise pollution (city) and those gaps are letting through tons of sound!
 
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  #2  
Old 09-27-17, 07:28 PM
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That is supposed to be finished? Or they just haven't finished it yet? I sure hope that window is not shoved clear out flush with the siding.

It's normal for there to be "some"gaps, but normally you want a maximum of 1/4" per side on a vinyl replacement window. Yes, it should be shimmed on the sides at the screw locations. (Follow mfg's installation instructions). Normally you want the screw to go through the shim to hold it in place. Either a flat shim that is the right width to fit snug or two tapered ones placed in opposite directions to form one pair that is flat. No shims are needed on top. A shim is only needed on bottom if it's required to level the window.

Then a blind stop is placed on the exterior side of the window. It's width is determined by measuring the optimum thickness because you don't want it to be too thick. It should cover the window edge by maybe 1/4" or so. After it is nailed to the jamb it is caulked to the window.

Did they put on a sill expander or can you see right under the window on the outside?

After the window is shimmed, leveled, and checked for square, but before the interior trim goes on, the window perimeter should be insulated. Window and door foam is often used... fiberglass can also be lightly packed around the window. Sometimes foam only makes a mess if the gap is tight. For tight gaps I prefer to use Dap latex window and door foam, it's less messy... or at least you can clean it up easier. Some installation instructions recommend the interior of the window be caulked to the jamb as a way of ensuring that it is completely air sealed.

As an additional point, don't crank your window open 90 degrees. I cant stress that enough to customers. There is no point in doing that, it doesn't allow more air in. Opening the window 45 degrees is far enough. You will just wear out your crank 50% faster if you continue to crank it open all the way... and that is the most common repair needed on a casement window. On a big heavy casement it also increases the pressure on the hardware and frame when you crank it open 90 degrees. And you don't get more air at 90 degrees than you do at 45. Casements tend to scoop air because air flows parallel to the house no matter which way the wind is blowing. End of rant.
 
  #3  
Old 09-27-17, 07:32 PM
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Thanks so much for the detailed response- great stuff!! To be fair I do not know if they are finished yet- that could just be where they left off today. Currently there are only gaps on the sides and top- the bottom of the window frame is sitting flush on the sill.
 
  #4  
Old 09-27-17, 07:42 PM
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Regarding the sill look on the OUTSIDE of the window, not the inside. If it is sitting on the old sloped sill there may be a gap under the new window... that gap needs to be insulated just like the sides, but it's done from the outside... and instead of a blind stop, a "sill expander" covers the gap between the window and the sloped sill.
 
  #5  
Old 09-28-17, 08:06 PM
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Assuming the window casement frame is not already torqued/warped by screwing it in with a clear gap and no shims- will we be able to insert shims now (tap in gently until pretty firm) either side of each screw and around the frame? I'm worried if they just try and insulate in the gap without any shims around the frame the whole window will be stressed at the mercy of the six screw locations..
 
  #6  
Old 09-28-17, 08:17 PM
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Yes that's fine. I doubt you have anything to worry about.
 
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