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Condensation in windows??


dragonfire665's Avatar
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02-11-18, 04:23 PM   #1  
Condensation in windows??

Hello everyone. I have a bit of a dilemma and I do not know exactly how to fix it or what is causing the problem. My master bedroom windows (2) during the winter, inside the bedroom from top to bottom they build condensation, to the point that it freezes. All that water then melts and its slowly damaging my wood frame. (Photos attached).

My bedroom has a master bathroom as well. I have a humidity reader and is usually at around 40 perfect even during the summer. No other rooms has this problem.

Hope someone could help me with a solution to this problem. Also during the winter I use a humidifier and during the summer a dehumidifier.

Thanks

Rick

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Gunguy45's Avatar
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02-11-18, 04:32 PM   #2  
You need to get more airflow on the window and lower the relative humidity in the room. There's really no other simple solution.


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XSleeper's Avatar
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02-11-18, 04:50 PM   #3  
You probably have a humidistat on your furnace that is set WAY too high. And you should not be running the humidifier if you dont want your windows to sweat. Having blinds closed or curtains drawn makes the window even colder. Are you sure they are locked?

Being there is a bathroom nearby, there is higher humidity due to taking showers and baths. You would need to run your bath fan constantly after a shower.

The moisture on the center and top of the glass is not between the panes, is it???

 
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02-12-18, 08:13 AM   #4  
25-30 is where we have ours set and only see moisture when it gets really cold.

A bathroom is probably the contributor for additional moister thus why it's on these windows only.

Need to run exhaust for 10 minutes to get rid of excess!

 
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02-12-18, 08:44 AM   #5  
Hi dragonfire,
The above advice is correct. The condensation and resulting ice is telling you the air at the surface of the glass is well below the dew point and curtains (blinds in your case) work to make that surface very cold.

One other possibility would be to dry everything lot (really dry) and install the shrink wrap plastic film. The difference is, the window will still get much colder but the film will prevent inside air from reaching the glass. The cold surface at risk of condensation becomes the plactic but it will be warmer than the glass.

They make timers for the bath fan switch to allow you to turn off the fan as you exit but it will continue to run for a selected amount of time.

best,
Bud

 
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02-27-18, 07:42 AM   #6  
sorry for the extreme delay. So, to prevent this from happening.

One run the dehumidifier instead
Two run the bath ceiling fan

I do not know why this is the only room this happens to.

I honestly though that the gasses inside the windows were not currently working, hence why the windows were building condensation. And as I stated, the condensation is inside the bedroom, where I can actually touch it. Not between the glass panels.

 
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02-27-18, 07:56 AM   #7  
This is definitely a case of excess humidity. Unfortunately there is a bit of a trade off in the winter between personal comfort and the state of your windows.

For instance, where I live winters are extremely cold (can get as bad as -40C). So if I maintain the humidity around 25% my windows are mostly okay. If I increase it to around 35-40 which is much better for my skin the windows are a total mess just like the picture you posted.

 
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02-27-18, 08:37 AM   #8  
Dragon,
Pick up an inexpensive humidity gauge that also records temperature. With temp and RH numbers you can determine the condensation temperature that will result in moisture on those windows. I suspect you master bedroom either from the humidifier or from the bathroom is running to humid.

Also, if you close the curtains in front of those windows the glass gets colder and you get more condensation. Storm windows on the outside are an option as they act as an extra layer of glass.

Bud

 
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02-27-18, 10:27 AM   #9  
I do not know why this is the only room this happens to.
I don't know why you can't understand that humidity in that room is probably elevated due to taking showers. We also haven't established if these windows are single pane or double pane.

 
dragonfire665's Avatar
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02-28-18, 07:14 PM   #10  
@XSleeper

As i stated, I do understand the humidity in this room play a huge and only factor. Thats why I came here looking for options and prevention because my wood is rooting from all the water the windows are building.

@Bud9051, I do have an humidity gauge.

https://www.amazon.com/AcuRite-Humid...humidity+gauge

thats what I have

Also Bud9051, can you give me a link or something to the shrink wrap you speak of.

 
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02-28-18, 07:17 PM   #11  
At the risk of repeating myself, are the windows single pane or double pane? If you can't tell, post a closeup picture of the edge of the glass and frame when it is not all foggy, and maybe we can tell. (We are looking to see if the glass has a spacer bar on the edge, which would indicate it is double pane.)

If those windows have single pane glass, that would also explain why they fog up so bad.

 
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