Old Doors, New Knobs

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  #1  
Old 02-20-19, 12:31 PM
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Old Doors, New Knobs

In a nutshell, I am replacing a doorknob that is decades old. The new door know is almost a mirror image of the old one, has the same fit and is the same make, Arrow. When I tighten the to screws to make both ends properly tightened, I lose the ability to turn the doorknob entirely. If I leave them a little loose, I can turn the doorknob and everything works. I have tried everything I can think of to figure out why this happening to no avail. Also, I donít currently have the means to replace the door entirely, though, I want to because it is showing its age. My last plan of attack is to use a door reinforcer to snug up the two knobs whithout bringing them together. Essentially, the idea is to make them snug before they get too close as that may be whatís causing the issue. Any thoughts or suggestions are appreciated.
 
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Old 02-20-19, 12:35 PM
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Metal door? There is supposed to be a C shaped spacer that comes with the door, it allows the latch to pass through the side of the C shape... but does not allow the door to be crushed when you tighten the screws.

Many people don't know what the plastic C-shaped piece is and they remove it an throw it away. Then have this problem.

If that piece is gone you can often make one out of some heavy gauge sheet metal. Or you can just look into buying a backing plate for the knobs. This will give them more surface area so that you can tighten them down.

The only other suggestion would be to get some blue locktite... Put it on your threads and only tighten the knob down the minimum amount to keep it from slipping around. If the door is already crushed, this plan probably will not work at all.
 
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Old 02-24-19, 08:15 AM
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Iím Sorry. I thought I already responded, I am new. So there wasnít a ring that I saw. What I ended doing was using a security from Defender Security. I placed a shim inside of the enforcer and hit it from view so it looks flush. This created the some of necessary distance. It may need a second one. The door itself was wood and have chunks that have just disintegrated over the years. I have more doors to do and I expect to have the same issue. It is almost like the door itself is just under sized.
 
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Old 02-24-19, 08:50 AM
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Could be... modern exterior doors are 1 3/4".
 
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