Paint sags filling "grain" in doors

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Old 10-03-19, 12:14 PM
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Paint sags filling "grain" in doors

What can I do about paint runs/sags filling in the valleys of faux grain stamped into the skins of hollow core interior doors? The paint sprayed 3 days ago is Bullseye 123 waterborne primer. A guy at a Sherwin Williams said to just sand it down to level before spraying some ProClassic semigloss, but if there is a way of cleaning out the valleys without making a terrible mess I would like to do it.
I was thinking of rubbing the area with a rag soaked in tsp or perhaps a paint remover designed for latex, but don't want to end up having to strip the entire door.
 
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Old 10-03-19, 12:26 PM
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If the paint is dry there is really no practical way to remove.

I've painted so many of these doors, brush and roller, I cant imagine how spraying them would put down so much paint that the grain would be filled up!
 
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Old 10-03-19, 12:36 PM
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Hard to say without seeing it but I suspect sanding and applying the finish coat is about all you can do.

I would not use TSP. It's not apt to have much effect on the dried primer and any leftover residue can present adhesion issues. Denatured alcohol will soften dried latex but I'd be afraid it would make more of a mess than help.
 
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Old 10-03-19, 12:49 PM
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U folk told me what the paint store guy said. Just sand the runs down as best I can and do the top coat. I will just spray the finish coat and take care to put down 2 light coats.

They got filled up in a couple of places because I am an idiot. The light was very poor in that part of the garage, which has been enclosed with plastic, and I must of shot so much as to cause a terrible sag and run.

Now I wish I had just brushed and rolled. I actually did one of these doors 10 years age that way and it is fine. Wiped the oil base with tsp and brushed and rolled. No adhesion problems.
 
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Old 10-03-19, 12:56 PM
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If the lighting is poor, take a trouble light or any portable light that you can shine up/down the door after you're done spraying. That way you should be able to pick up any thin spots or runs. More than once I've knocked a run out with a brush - it will never be seen on that type of door.
 
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Old 10-03-19, 05:38 PM
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Good suggestion. I actually got a trouble light hung where I sanded the run down, but should have used it as I sprayed to check for runs as I found some on another door located in a poorly lit and hard to access area. I think this may have been there from spraying the primer instead of the first top coat I laid down today, when I was much more careful to move quickly and keep a uniform 12 inches from the door (I was a little closer the other day ).

Anyway, the first top coat looks pretty good. I will hit it lighly with some 220 and lay down a second tomorrow. That will give the first 24 hours to cure while assuring that I benefit from whatever sunlight filters through garage doors and the plastic drop cloths.

I guess I am laying down about the proper amount of paint. The can says that a gallon covers 350 to 400 sq ft and I used half a gallon to do both sides and the front and back of 6 doors. That is with 312 fine finish low pressure tip. My sprayer doesn't have a pressure gauge, but it is supposed to deliver 3000 psi when cranked up and I have it set about halfway between the paint roller setting and maximum. What looked good when testing on some kraft paper.

Thanks for the help
 
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Old 10-04-19, 09:13 AM
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As for the cause of my sags and runs, whether true or not I read elsewhere that Proclassic can run fairly easily if coats aren't thin. One person ventured that the first top coat should be the thinner than the second. Another warned against going back and fogging spots that may have been a bit too light. Get those during the second coat. Whether any of these tips are correct, the mods here can say. I really don't know.


Anyhow, the product seems fine. The problem is with the painter, me. I am going back and pick up some more Proclassic as SW is on sale. [It wasn't when I bought the first gallon, but the manager told me to wait and it would be on sale. I said I couldn't wait and, when I looked at my receipt I saw that he gave me the sale price of 30% off.
 
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Old 10-04-19, 11:45 AM
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I'm partial to ProClassic. I can't say that I've ever had run issues with it but then I've been painting for a long time. It doesn't like to be over brushed. I always thought it sprayed well and like the fact that it sets up quick. For the most part I've sprayed it with just one coat, normally with a 4/15 tip.
 
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Old 10-04-19, 06:28 PM
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I liked the Pro Classic enough to buy enough more to do the interiors of the entry doors (can it be done that way?) as well as the rest of the interior doors with some hang tall bb on the second floor. It didn't hurt that SW is having a sale.

Anyway, I did a second coat on this batch of doors, but if I knew what I was doing I can see where a single coat of color would suffice. The second coat was necessary on a couple where the sags had to be sanded down. As I was doing this, I stopped spraying a few times and inspected for sags with my trouble light (if that is what it is. Its a lot brighter than my old fat lamp). I caught few sags and runs and instantly dispatched them with a brush as suggested. Unfortunately, when all done and cleaning up I found a pretty nasty sag down low but in the center of a door. This was to late to try to brush out and I left it to dry. I should be able to sand it down and touch that one area up with a brush.

Now for doing the door jambs and trim with the boss over the weekend.
 
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