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Water from Well Window and other basement window

Water from Well Window and other basement window


  #1  
Old 08-16-20, 06:18 AM
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Water from Well Window and other basement window

Hi, In last storm, we got water in our basement through window. we have two windows
1.) Well window
2.) Regular basement
There is sumppump pipe cracked right outside or regular small window, pipe we are replacing but what can I do to stop this water entering through window? and pipe is far from well window, so why water came through there?

see pics., caulking would work?






 
  #2  
Old 08-16-20, 06:29 AM
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If it was dripping from the top of the window we need pictures of the outside, not the inside. Pics that show the cover, the siding and far enough away to show anything above this window, such as other windows.
 
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Old 08-16-20, 06:50 AM
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outside looks like this





 
  #4  
Old 08-16-20, 06:51 AM
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Since water is dripping from above the window the source of the leak is somewhere above. Inspect outside for anywhere water can enter.
 
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Old 08-16-20, 07:03 AM
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Since you have a poured foundation, the first place to look is to get inside the window well and examine the caulking above the window.

2nd thing to check, unzip some of the vinyl siding under the windows and doors (you will need a Malco sideswiper and might need to watch some youtube videos) to see if it is wet behind the siding. Water can leak behind the siding at the bottom corners of your windows. This is normal and does not need to be caulked. The problem occurs when there is no WRB (housewrap) or when the WRB gets rotten.

3rd, there could be an issue where the deck attaches to the house. If the sheathing behind the ledger is rotten, water would dump right into the wall below your door and come out above the window. Looks like you would need to remove the bolts holding it to the house and get a couple people to help you move it away.

4th, when gutters are plugged, water can pretty easily pour right into the window wells and fill them up. Cleaning the gutters, and putting covers over the window walls can help.
 
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Old 08-16-20, 07:44 AM
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Thank you both for your reply. do you think this space between ground and slab could be an issue? if it is how do I fill it? shouldn't the well cover protect against it ?



 
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Old 08-16-20, 08:34 AM
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I would have someone inside the house looking at the window while someone else outside directs a garden hose at different areas starting at the bottom. I would focus on checking if water is running down the outside of the foundation and getting in at the top of the window. I would also spray water at the base of the door and deck ledger board.
 
  #8  
Old 10-02-21, 12:33 PM
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Sumppump Discharge pipe grading

Thank you. I tried a few suggestions and pir water from the top and around it.. but it did not show up on the basement..good thing..

so as preventive measure.. i want to grade my sumppump pipe properly.. here is how it looks it is pretty flat and may be even -ve so water may freeze and it emy prevent sumppump to function improperly or throw water near foundation..




How so do i grade this discharge pipe..






 
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Old 10-02-21, 12:39 PM
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water may freeze
Ground water is around 55 degrees, the water is pumped under pressure outside, as long as it doesn't pool at the end and has a bit of slope you can forget that concern!
 
  #10  
Old 10-02-21, 01:03 PM
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I would like to forget that problem.

but last season, it froze , so I better be prepared..

so should I put 45 coupling instead of 90, but it will be handing so how should I support that 45 angle? and even than it will not cover 1/8" slope all the way.. any bright ideas?
 
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Old 10-02-21, 01:17 PM
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but last season, it froze
Impossible, unless the water is pooling at the end of the pipe, blocking water flow, there is no way a sump discharge of that length will freeze!
 
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Old 10-02-21, 01:23 PM
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You need to keep the end of the pipe clear. Scoop the snow at the end of the pipe so that water can drain away. 1/4" per ft would be best. Your elbows are fine.
 
  #13  
Old 10-02-21, 01:23 PM
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you have no idea how much I want to agree with you

but if water stays in the pipe (due to flat or little -ve slope), which is above ground ( not berried ), why would it not freeze?

FYI.. there is another 15' pipe inside basement.. in case you are thinking about the sump-pump pressure that it throws.
 
 

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