Waterproofing stationary windows


  #1  
Old 03-27-21, 05:57 PM
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Waterproofing stationary windows

I have this A frame cabin with a wall of very basic stationary single pane windows that were home made in the 60痴. There is a decent overhang on the roof, but not enough when we get a driving rain. The seals around the windows are all failed and need to be re sealed. I知 trying to figure out the best way to seal them.
I知 attaching a photo of the windows as well as a drawing of the window construction from side view.

For the red spot on the drawing the seal between the stop and the glass, I was considering butyl tape, or some high quality caulking,
for the blue spot between the stop and the frame, i was thinking caulking between the stops and the 2x4 frame.

Wondering if I知 on the right track here or if I should be doing something different.
Thanks,


 

Last edited by PJmax; 03-27-21 at 07:26 PM. Reason: resized pics
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Old 03-27-21, 08:19 PM
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A lot depends on the finish on the wood, which we can't see.

Typically the ONLY type of caulk to use against glass will be 100% silicone. Anyone who says different is not in the business.

The type of silicone that you use on glass is not readily paintable, so ideally you would plan accordingly. So for instance, if your exterior trim is stained wood, I would suggest you do all the prep needed to get the wood sanded and completely stained. Then caulk the glass perimeters last using a silicone that matches/compliments the stain color or at least doesn't clash. Or if you are replacing all the exterior trim, I would put a thin bead of silicone under the stops, making sure nothing squishes out. Then sand and stain the stops. Once its dry, then caulk the glass last.

The same would go for painted stops. Get them all painted, caulk them with a matching silicone last.

Probably the best longest lasting silicone will be made by Dow Corning. (791 or 795) Not cheap but its also not the low quality silicone that you buy at the box store.

You use silicone on glass because of its elasticity and serviceability. You need to be able to easily remove the old glazing when its time to do it again... without breaking the glass.

As for glazing tape, you could use it, but you would still need to caulk over it with silicone. If you completely remove the exterior stops, it is also usually a good idea to caulk the edges of the single pane glass, to ensure no interior air is leaking around them. This helps ensure that condensation doesn't break your glass in the winter.

Hard to believe anyone would put single pane glass in a house in NH.. Even in the 60s. Double pane glass was available long before that. But I guess energy was cheap back then too.
 
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Old 03-28-21, 12:49 PM
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Thanks XSleeper. This is a 3 season cabin that is shut down completely (no heat or power) around Columbus Day for winter. I知 thinking when I do this, I値l replace the stops with new stops that have more of an angle to shed water. The stops that are there are fairly flat and wide so water sits on them. I知 thinking of making my new stops out of oak or possibly Azek? The Dow 795 properties sheet says it sticks to plastic, and Vinyl, PVC-U, as well as wood. I壇 paint the new stops before installing them. I understand putting a bead of silicone between the stops and the frame before installing the stops. Would you also recommend a bead of silicone between the stop and the glass before installing the stop? Or just a bead of silicone after the stops are installed (similar to how traditional putty glazing is installed? Do you tool the silicone after applying it? (My caulking skills are pretty bad, especially when up on a ladder like this project will require). If you do tool the silicone after installing it, can you recommend a tool for this? Final question- How thick should be bead of silicone be? Thanks again.
 
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Old 03-28-21, 02:06 PM
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I would just run a surface bead. Putting it between the stop and the glass would likely destroy the glass if anyone wanted to remove a stop.

If you use Azek, it can't be painted any dark color.

The mfg specifies the optimum size of the bead for their product. Typically it should be 1/4x1/4x3/8 but fudging a little on the small side sure looks better, and doesn't use so much caulk.

I would not tool it, but I have a lot of practice. If you do tool it, you should spritz it with rubbing alcohol in a squirt bottle AFTER you caulk, but before you tool it with a finger. Have plenty of paper towels. Looks like you should be doing this from a genie lift, the way it looks in the photos. A waste basket and a roll of paper towels in the basket with you will be necessary. The rubbing alcohol is like magic, the silicone won't make a mess when you tool it as long as you keep wiping your finger off in the paper towels.
 
 

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