Replacing Windows on Old House


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Old 05-13-22, 08:16 PM
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Replacing Windows on Old House

Looking for some advice on how to go about this project. My house is almost 100 years old. I am replacing all the windows. I am doing tons of other updates, so the area is totally gutted. The exterior was vinyl sided several years ago, before I bought the house. The vinyl siding forms a J-channel around the existing exterior trim. I plan on reframing all the windows due to various issues such as rotted wood, split wood, warped wood, and no headers anywhere. I will then replace the exterior trim.

I at first thought I could use the new construction windows with the nailing flange, but the ones I have looked at (Jeld Wen) only come with a J-channel around the window itself, which I don't really need. If I don't want the J-channel, I need to get the block frame windows (no nailing flange). From what I have found, the block frame windows are harder to seal, and have a higher chance of leaking, but seem like they would make it easier to add the exterior trim. The J-channel windows, on the other hand, will allow easier sealing with flashing, but seem like it would be difficult getting the trim behind the J-channel, and may not look right anyway.

Has anyone else run into this?
 
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Old 05-13-22, 08:24 PM
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If I don't want the J-channel, I need to get the block frame windows (no nailing flange).
That's incorrect, you would only want to consider a window with a nailing flange, for flashing purposes.
 
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Old 05-14-22, 06:26 AM
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That's incorrect, you would only want to consider a window with a nailing flange, for flashing purposes.
Thank you, that makes sense to me. However, if the model of windows I'm looking at only come with the nailing flange and the built-in J-channel together, would it work to add trim to the outside of the window's J-channel? Is that what other people do? Or should I just try to find windows that come with the nailing flange but no J-channel, since there already exists a J-channel made with the vinyl siding?
 
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Old 05-14-22, 06:32 AM
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I should add that the windows I have been looking at are Jeld Wen Brickmould, which have what looks like a narrow piece of "trim" made with the window, so you can install it and not have to add trim. The siding will come right up against its J-channel. It seems like I maybe shouldn't add more trim to the outside, if even just for aesthetics.
 
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Old 05-14-22, 06:34 AM
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That is one way to do it. But imo you would want trim that is thicker than the j channel, and the resulting perimeter joint must be caulked. You also should not install solid trim inside the j channel or tight to the window due to expansion and contraction. Many kinds of siding and trim will also rot inside the j channel when water gets in there, even if it is caulked water will often find a way in... J channel is made for vinyl siding.

Or should I just try to find windows that come with the nailing flange but no J-channel, since there already exists a J-channel made with the vinyl siding?
That's what I would suggest.
 
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Old 05-14-22, 11:53 AM
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I should add that the windows I have been looking at are Jeld Wen Brickmould
Just for clarification, since I just ordered six Jen Weld Brickmold windows yesterday for my new garage outbuilding.

The "Brickmold" is the feature that allows siding to fit behind the flange of the window, they also have the nailing flange.

You want to add your own trim then non-Brickmold windows (new construction, with nailing flange) are what you want.
 
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Old 05-16-22, 06:05 PM
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Thank you for the replies!
 
 

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