stanley door rubs

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  #1  
Old 04-09-02, 06:09 PM
rwd007
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stanley door rubs

I have a stanley steal door installed for about 8 years. It is now
rubbing in the upper corner opposite the hinge. I've put longer screws in the hinges (hopping they would bite and pull the doow onto the hinge - away from the rub) but it did not improve the problem. The long screws actually spin freely because the hinge is mounted into nothing more than the 1 inch wood of the jamb (correct term?).
What can I do to get the door to open/close smoothly - short of shaving down the door jamb?
BYW - this is an enterence door with the side lites (correct term?) on either side of the door. It was installed a one big unit (the door and two side lights)

Thank you for your help.
 
  #2  
Old 04-12-02, 04:54 PM
R
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The screw holes for the hinge are stripped. The hinge probably has 3 screws for each side. The way to correct this problem is to fill the screw holes to the point the screws can grab and hold the door plumb. You have to use the original screws to do this.

Open the door and take a door stop or a similar wedge and slide it under the door side where the knob is. This wedge will be used to hold the door up when you take out the screws and to plumb the door. Then take the screws out on the jamb side of the hinge. Move the hinge away from the jamb to expose the screw holes on the jamb.

On the top and bottom screw hole take some tooth picks and dip them in wood carpenters glue and insert them in the holes. Making sure the tooth picks don't protrude from the jamb. Take a screw and screw it in half way and then do the same to the other screw hole. Allow 10 minutes to set up and carefully take out the screws.

For the middle screw hole, fold back the hinge. Take a tooth pick and dip it in nail polish and insert it into the middle hole. Then the screw. You may want to plumb the door first. You do that by taking a level and putting it on the side with the knob and moving the wedge in or out until plumb.

I like letting the carpenters glue to set up overnight before attempting to insert the screws. Some say you don't have to, I do. When you insert the top and bottom screws, you definately have to have the door plumb. After they're done you can do the same with the middle screw hole, just make sure the tooth picks don't protrude.
 
  #3  
Old 04-13-02, 06:47 AM
rwd007
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Thanks for the advice - I will give it a try.
Just as an aside question, Do you think the door jamb could have shifted at all? Do you know of an easy way to check the door and jamp are out of plumb?
 
  #4  
Old 04-13-02, 08:55 AM
R
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The easiest way to check for plumb on a jamb is to use a plumb bob. You need a nail, string the length of the jamb and a small weight. Tack the nail above the jamb you think is out of plumb about 1 inch from the inside of the door jamb. Attach the string to the nail and the weight to the other end and let hang just above floor. When the string stops moving, measure the distance from the string to the jamb at different points on the jamb. If all the points are equal, then the jamb is plumb, if not, it's out of plumb. Since you have lights on both sides, it's going to a little difficult to plumb the jamb, but not impossible. If this is the case, let me know and I need more information about the jamb to tell you how to plumb it.
 
 

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