single room attic fans [Merged & Moved Posts]

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Old 05-22-05, 02:54 PM
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acceptable attic temps

It there a guide or a formula that one can consider as a normal attic temp? For instance, if the outside temp is 70 degrees is it acceptable to be 90 degrees in the attic? - or -

If the is 90 degrees and it is now night and the outside temp is 60 degrees, how long should it stay at 90. Should it drop proportionally as quick as the outside temp?

If the attic temp is 90 and my room in the house is 70, should the ceiling feel warmer? If not, is the 90 degree air making it through my drywall?

Lots of questions here. I trying to figure out how much benefit I will receive from opening my currently closed soffitt vents.
 
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Old 05-22-05, 02:57 PM
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single room attic fans

Anybody with experience with a room fan called "quitecool". I'm wondering if anyone has used one and if they liked it. The idea seems good. It also seems easy to build yourself.
 
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Old 05-22-05, 03:56 PM
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Soffit vents should not be closed. Ventilation is important year round. Your first step should be to determine if you have adequate ventilation. The second step should be to determine if you have adequate insulation. There are many variables that factor into an attic's temperature besides the outdoor temperature.

http://www.factsfacts.com/MyHomeRepair/ventilation.htm

http://www.progress-energy.com/about...icsroofing.asp

http://www.countrystyletx.com/034/034_energy.html

Make sure your attic is properly ventilated. If not, attic temperatures can reach 140-160 degrees. High temperatures cause increased air conditioning costs and can reduce the life of your roof. To have natural ventilation, your attic must have a balance of intake vents and exhaust vents. Intake vents should be positioned lower than exhaust vents to achieve maximum benefit. Power-operated attic fans are generally not a good idea since they typically use more energy than they save.

Insulation is a line of defense between attic temperatures and the living space. Adequate insulation can reduce the amount of heat transfer into living area. Vapor retarder beneath insulation prevents warm, moist air from reaching the cold attic in winter where it can cause condensation problems.

http://doityourself.com/attic/properventilation.htm
 
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