basement ventilation advice

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  #1  
Old 07-17-06, 10:06 PM
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Ian
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basement ventilation advice

I need some advice/direction; Iíve nosed through the existing threads but could not find any help. I am trying to get better airflow in my unfinished basement (standard cape cod style home 1950ís) in PA.
My basement does not have any water problems other than being damp which leads to a musty smell and a crabby wife. The dehumidifier helps but not to my total satisfaction.
I would like to install a central mounted fan that will exhaust but I am not sure where to begin or what materials I would need. I was thinking towards using an existing furnace fan hung from the floor joists in the center of the basement and duct outside (4" pipe with 2-4 vents).
Can someone point me in the right direction?
 
  #2  
Old 07-18-06, 12:14 AM
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You cannot exhaust any air without bringing in an equal amount of air from the outside. Where will you get this "make-up" air?

If you really want a positive air exchange in your basement then I would suggest an air-to-air heat exchanging ventilation system.

http://www.smarthome.com/3033.html

http://www.renewaire.com/ERVAttractionPage.htm
 
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Old 07-18-06, 09:34 PM
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If you have a "damp and musty" basement then you do have a moisture problem. Question is what is the source of the moisture? Does the basement have a concrete floor? If so, does it seem damp/wet. If so, do you know if any plastic (or other waterproof material) was put down before slab was poured. If nothing, then it may be water migrating up thru slab via capillary flow. Are the basement walls damp-proofed or water-proofed? If not, you could be getting plenty of moisture thru walls.

Go to buildingscience.com and start reading about moisture problems in basements and crawlspaces. Lots of good ideas there. Might help you identify where your problem is coming from.

In this case the solution to your problem might NOT be additional air dilution. Using that approach, it might take a LOT of air to remove the moisture.
 
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Old 09-18-08, 10:08 PM
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Safe but red neck ?????????

That hanging celing idea is pretty crazy, might catch a few fingers.......... oh and maybe yours too. Not to mention a long haired friend too!! Any how if you have a window to sacrifice, (the cheap way) Or the dignity to 4 inch hole saw an opening in a kosher area away from intake for an efficient (pvc) situation. You may be able to put that moter in a safe place (12") off the floor. Flooding purposes mainly. Boxed with a filter that is able to be changed frequently (16x25x1) minimum. This will save not only fingers ect......., but the moter itself. Get your carpentry skills into effect. Use straight pipe not (cheap corrugated dryer vent) You can use a dryer termination vent. Seperate from the dryer (DUH!!) Run it up, over what ever you need. Just keep in mind water runs down hill. So build in a manner that suits the situation. ABOVE ALL CONNECT THS MOTER TO A GFI PLUG. Not a gfi circuit a DIRECT PLUG DEDICATED TO THIS FAN MOTER. This really works wonders. You just need to understand this is going to suck alot of air and that air may come from the air your paying to heat or cool. If you do not care this will dry a basement all day long litterally. Oh yeah maybe add a switch to turn it off, you will need it,trust me. DRYYYYYYYYYYYYYY for sure. I live in a low lying area with swamp in the area. This worked during the spring,summer and fall. Western new york. The winter is winter (frozen) then we start over again. Just follow basic venting, electric and carpentry skills and codes and really you can dry a basement for much less than a heat recovery system all day long. (3 dehumidifires did ok, but this did much better.) Less electricity by far. (2000) sq.ft.
 
  #5  
Old 09-19-08, 05:33 AM
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A good dehumidifier should be able to handle 2500 square ft. basement. Cheap dehumidifiers will need at least two.
 
 

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