Island venting


  #1  
Old 01-16-07, 01:21 AM
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Lightbulb Island venting

I'm doing a 2-tier kitchen island (one side workspace, the other side a bar/stool height), and using a standard gas stove/oven in it. I'm not to keen on traditional venting methods (stainless steel hood, pop-up downdraft vent (wouldn't work with this unit anyway), etc).. and am considering some alternatives.

Since I'll have plenty of room in the back wall of the prep area (the second tier will be about 12" higher, to accomodate the back of the stove), I was considering putting in two vents, one on either side of the stove. I'd then connect these vents with standard ductwork built into the island down to the floor, and over and out the closest wall. I'm told that there really isn't that much grease that'll get into the duct, but I'd probably stick to all rigid tin anyway - wouldn't want flex to get gunked up. I'd most likely join them together, and toss a remote blower in the basement, hopefully giving me lots of power, but keeping upstairs noise to a minimum. I'd probably compliment all this with a standard bathroom fan in the ceiling above it all, something quiet but decent CFM.

Does this seem feasible? If so, does anyone have suggestions on blowers, etc? Looking at those stove center-mounted downdraft systems, this seems like it'd be every bit as effective. The alternative would perhaps be to raise the counter the height of some ductwork, and actually put the vents directly facing the sides of the stove, but I'd rather not do that if need be.

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-16-07, 02:22 AM
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"Does this seem feasible?" No. It would be much simpler and more efficient to go with a regular downdraft stove which is used in island cooking.

Without overhead vent hood, a stove designed for island cooking with recommended down draft venting is used. Vent system is installed per manufacturer's instructions.

http://www.keidel.com/design/select/vent-hoods.htm

"I'm told that there really isn't that much grease that'll get into the duct."

By whom? Did they site any documented research to substantiate this.

"Toss a remote blower in the basement."

Downdraft, already not as efficient as other venting methods, will be more inefficient with a remote blower located in the basement.

"I'd probably compliment all this with a standard bathroom fan in the ceiling above it all."

An exhaust above would work against the down draft. Bathroom vents require venting through the roof which is also required for the canopy overhead vents. If going through the roof, an overhead vent system would be more efficient than downdraft.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 11:10 AM
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"Bathroom vents require venting through the roof which is also required for the canopy overhead vents. If going through the roof, an overhead vent system would be more efficient than downdraft."

I had planned on venting it through the roof, of course. However, a ceiling/bathroom type vent can mount nearly flush with the ceiling, as opposed to having an obnoxious hood in the middle of the room. It would merely be there for anything that would have escaped the side vents, it would not be there to work against them.

As far as the grease in the pipe -- no, he didn't have a PhD in grease control. I've talked to a couple people in plumbing stores, and I read one person on the forums here who made that comment.

I assume by using a remote blower, I can also size it larger, hopefully eliminating the inefficiency factor. Obviously remote blowers work - the furnace seems to keep up fine from the basement.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 11:40 AM
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Wink

I say check out all the vent fans at Grainger for what you want to try and do here . At grease in the duct . Its a lot in what you cook and how all the time. I would put the small grease filters in the intakes by the stove. Grainger should have fans and blowers for what you want . That would go in the ceiling and down in the joist line or mount on the out side wall at the joist line. They carry the full line of Broan fans and other brands. Dont forget the water line so you can fill the pots right on the stove.
 
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Old 01-16-07, 11:53 AM
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Thanks Ed - for some reason I had forgot about Grainger, that'd be a good place to hit. Grease filters would also be a good idea, especially if I can find one that'll easily fit the design, or built into the duct grill, etc.
 
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Old 01-21-07, 05:15 AM
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How about the Fantech series of inline blowers? They are speed adjustable and advertise as being low noise. I am taking on a very similar project; tore down 1/2 of the wall between the kitchen and dining room and now the (new) slide in gas range is in the island that was once cabinets + full wall. I'm planning on venting it above 6 inches above the range behind it, as I've left about 8 inches of wall up above the level of the counter. Then I'll put a 6" Fantech just below the floor surface and duct it outside from there.

I was considering one of these two:
Model FX 6: 257 cfm, 84 watts, for 6 inch duct
Model FX 6XL: 392 cfm, 147 watts, for 6 inch duct

What do you think?
 
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Old 01-21-07, 05:47 AM
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That fan looks like a nice option. I wonder what "whisper quiet" really means, I don't see a any noise ratings in here..

I also wonder if "Suitable for airstream temperatures up to 140 F" would be an issue. Obviously hot steam can be .. hot ... but maybe not that hot once it makes it to the blower?
 
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Old 01-21-07, 06:16 AM
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I was wondering the same about the heat. The brochure you can download from the mfg site specifically lists this fan as appropriate for range hood exhaust, so I was going with that. Here's a link to a picture of the wall I'm going to install the downdraft in -- the range is just behind the higher segment of the wall:
http://mywebpages.comcast.net/suestelzmann/Kitchen/images/dsc01952.jpg

Did you see anything esp. promising at Grainger?
 
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Old 01-21-07, 06:19 AM
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Looks nice - or will when you're done.

I haven't had a chance to evaluate the stuff at Grainger yet -- I've been too busy wiring the house, insulating the new walls, getting quotes on the island, etc.
 
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Old 01-21-07, 06:46 PM
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Anyone have advice on the ductwork that will go down the wall between two studs (16" centers), through the bottom plate & subfloor, and then connect to 6" flexible duct pipe? Better yet, anyone have a recommendation on a book or other How To source? Thanks for any input.
 
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Old 01-21-07, 07:20 PM
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FWIW, I was thinking of using a square duct to fill the cavity, but the more I think about it, I think I'll just do a 6" round (I have 2x6 walls, and can easily shim it out a bit to make it a full 6"). You can get vents that attach to it, as well as it being the correct size for the blower. I'm guessing you can also get a 6" outside louver type vent well. I'm no pro though, hopefully someone else will chime in.
 
 

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