Circulating pellet stove heat,


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Old 12-09-07, 01:35 PM
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Circulating pellet stove heat,

I recently purchased a pellet stove for my 24x24' attached garage which is now my electrical shop.

The door from the garage enters into my kitchen, I have a 1,200 sq' 1 story L shaped ranch house with forced hot air heat. At the far end of the house is the living room, an office and the master bedroom.

I'm trying to move air from the garage to the furthest rooms of the house not to do all the heating but to suppliment my oil furnace. Leaving the door open helps to heat the house but not as well as I would like.

My Idea is to cut floor registers into the 3 furthest rooms and run a duct through the basement to the garage and use some kind of low noise power blower off of a thermostat to push the air into the garage inturn pulling warm air through the house to the furthest rooms. I don't want to cause a wind tunnel from the garage through the kitchen just a slow movement of air that would also help to pull heat from the kitchen into the other rooms.

My Questions are

1: Does this sound like an Idea that would work?

2: What amount of CFM should I shoot for?

3:What kind of power equipment is availible to move the air?
(variable speed would be nice)

4: What type & size ducting would be best and what size registers?

5: Any other thoughts on how to accomplish this project would be greatly appreciated?

Thanks Stan.
 
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Old 12-09-07, 03:26 PM
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You have some code issues here. Have you tried turning your fan to on and let that move the air.
 
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Old 12-09-07, 03:37 PM
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I have tried turning on the furnace fan and found that it doesn't help much. No inspection in my town for single family dwellings, I assume the code your talking about is fire seperation from the garage, the shop in my garage is full of equipment and shelving for my electrical business and could never fit a car in if I tried.
Stan
 
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Old 12-10-07, 08:44 AM
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Regardless if you can fit a car in there or not th space you are talking about is still considered a garage, code and zoning wise.

Yes, you could put a 750 cfm low noise (oversized) blower in the "garage" and duct it to the return air side of your existing furnace.
If something were to happen though you may not have insurance coverage or be personally liable if someone got hurt.

What you would need to do is have the garage remodeled and recognized as living space before you can combine heating systems.

Besides, are you positive that there is a net savings in heating with pellets?
 
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Old 12-10-07, 12:03 PM
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Wink

Im with GregH here. You might go to
http://warmair.net and compare fuel cost
Also as long as you say garage--- you dont want any opening from it to the home. Also any flame has to be 2 ft. up off the floor.
 
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Old 12-10-07, 02:57 PM
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Ya, I forgot about the "distance from floor" rule.

Ed is familiar with two feet being code but where I am it is five feet.
This means that an open flame in a garage must be at least five feet off the floor.
Here this also means that the base of the device has to be mounted five feet, not the flame.

You really are in a gray area here.
In all likelihood nothing will happen and everything will be peachy but this is not why we buy insurance.

Does your insurance company know you have a wood burning device and is it specifically included in your house insurance?
I pay $85.00/year extra on my house insurance for the wood burning furnace I have and when we bought the house needed to provide pictures and confirm that the stove was approved and installed to code.
 
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Old 12-10-07, 05:12 PM
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You guy's may be right about calling the insurance co. although I have talked to a few people that have installed pellet stoves and all were told by there insur. co. no problem as long as it isn't a wood stove, they don't like wood stoves. Again there is no state authority to enforce building codes in single family homes although there are some towns that have there own building inspectors that enforce the code. My electrical code defines a garage as a building or portion of a building in which one or more self propelled vehicles can be kept for use, sale, storage, rental, repair, exhibition, or demonstration purposes. None of these applie as one side I have taken about 10' of the depth and turned it into living space separate from the shop and the other side has permanently mounted shelving and equipment in the way to prevent a vehicle from fitting in, The shop is completely finished except for the concrete floor. Once again there are no code enforcement officials in the state or the town to enforce any codes. Getting back to the original question, I'm not looking to tie into the hot air furnace but rather have a independent ventilation system to take air from the furthest rooms and force it back into my shop to force a circulation. I would install an interlok to prevent this from operating if the furnace was to kick on, any idea's Stan

ps I checked out that site ed mentioned and they list corn pellets, I compared on another site and it is cheaper to burn pellets then oil or gas.
 
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Old 12-11-07, 09:05 PM
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Post Add to the last advise

I am a fire inspector in the state of Minnesota and recently had somebody call me with the same question regarding the use of a pellet stoves in a garage space. He had also told me that the insurance company was ok with it as long as the authority having jurisdiction would permit its use. Our state adopts the international fire code and it doesn't allow any heating device that creates hot ashes to be in a space that has the potential of having flamable gases, like gasoline. The pellet stoves have a ash box that needs to be dumped on a weekly basis. I know this because I have a pellet stove in my basement. When I was working on shift fighting fire, I experienced a couple of garage fires which were started by gasoline vapors that found a heat source, one was with BBQ ashes and the other with a gas water heater improperly installed. I'm not sure what your state enforces but be very carefull with what you store in that space, it can be devastating. Sorry for giving you some discouraging news, but I'd rather be safe then sorry.
 
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Old 12-14-07, 06:22 PM
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Originally Posted by slp29 View Post
I am a fire inspector in the state of Minnesota and recently had somebody call me with the same question regarding the use of a pellet stoves in a garage space. He had also told me that the insurance company was ok with it as long as the authority having jurisdiction would permit its use. Our state adopts the international fire code and it doesn't allow any heating device that creates hot ashes to be in a space that has the potential of having flamable gases, like gasoline. The pellet stoves have a ash box that needs to be dumped on a weekly basis. I know this because I have a pellet stove in my basement. When I was working on shift fighting fire, I experienced a couple of garage fires which were started by gasoline vapors that found a heat source, one was with BBQ ashes and the other with a gas water heater improperly installed. I'm not sure what your state enforces but be very carefull with what you store in that space, it can be devastating. Sorry for giving you some discouraging news, but I'd rather be safe then sorry.
I'm very cautious when it comes to protecting my home, I have never parked my vehicles in the garage except for my 4 wheeler during deer season. Never have I stored gasoline or other containers with flammable material in the garage other then my generator. Soon as I bought the pellet stove the generator had a new home in the shed as does the atv. Also one of the first projects I did was to add and tie in another carbon monoxide/smoke detector in the garage (whoops I mean electric shop ) with the other detectors in the house. I sleep better at night.
 
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Old 12-15-07, 08:37 AM
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You may not understand what is being said here.

Regardless of how careful you are or what you store in your garage it is still a garage and zoning rules and your insurance policy have rules governing how things are supposed to be.

Hopefully your caution in using this space will keep you out of trouble.
You need to know however your insurance policy is a contract and you must adhere to the terms if you ever need to collect on it.
For sure you would not get a penny if the stove or anything near the stove caused damage.
The fact that it is there in unrelated damage could also kick in an obscure clause.

At least for certain you do not want to do anything in hooking up ductwork anywhere near to this thing.

Just out of curiosity, why don't you call your insurance provider on Monday and ask them "what if" you get a wood burner and if they say it is ok then see if they will put that in writing.
 
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Old 12-15-07, 10:15 AM
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It may be necessary to permanently remove the door that would normally allow an automobile entrance to the space before the insurance company would consider it not to be a garage.
 
 

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