Return Register vs Air Duct


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Old 06-09-08, 10:21 AM
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Return Register vs Air Duct

Hiya,

How can I tell what is an air return register and just a regular air duct supplying air to a room? I figured it was the bigger square vents on the walls but they seem to be blowing air in my home?

thanks!
 
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Old 06-09-08, 05:33 PM
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Hold a piece of paper next to the grille. If it is sucked against the grille it is a return and if it is blown away from the grille it is a supply.
 
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Old 06-10-08, 05:20 AM
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thanks, I ended up doing that last night and I found an air return on each level. the funny thing is that the upstairs which is the hottest level seems to have the strongest pull and the downstairs which is the coolest (basement) has the weakest.

I'm still trying to tie down what is causing the upstairs to be so much hotter.

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-10-08, 06:06 AM
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Where is your thermostat located? If it is located on the first floor then it is reading the temp of that floor....when you set it to 72 and the first floor hits 72 the AC shuts off. Since the hot air rises the upstairs will allways be hotter unless the thermostat is moved upstairs.
 
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Old 06-10-08, 10:56 AM
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Understood there; it is on the 1st floor. How much variance is there normally between the levels in a scenario where the tstat is located on the 1st floor?

Also, in response to moving air in the attic I'm assuming it's a dumb idea to add a return up there to pull air out of it?

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-10-08, 12:06 PM
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Varience in temp. depends on alot of variables with the house. I have an older house built in the 30's and with no AC on if it is 78 upstairs its usually 70 degrees downstairs. Now with the AC on and my thermostat upstairs set on 72, it usually gets to about 70 downstairs.

A return air should not be placed in the attic...you should have some sort of vent system for the attic during the summer. Most newer homes have some sort of vent up near the peak where the roof meets the siding or on the roof itself. Take a walk around your house and look up at the siding near the attic, you might see a grill going through the siding. This is where the hot air will exit during the summer months.
 
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Old 06-10-08, 12:27 PM
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It may just be the way it's supposed to be then, I do have a continuous ridge vent installed at the peak of my roof but have soffit vents only on the front half of the house.

I'm going to go up tomorrow and make sure the vents don't have any insulation laid on top of them. I know I do not have insulation baffles as well. Are they placed just at the bottom or run straight up (the full length of the roof) to the ridge vent?

Thanks!

@ Chrisl285: So the tstat is on the upper most floor and it doesn't lower the lower level temperatures at all? Between AC on and off that is.
 
 

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