Kitchen range hood

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Old 01-07-09, 08:46 PM
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Kitchen range hood

I am putting a range hood over my stove and it is on an inside wall with cabinets above. I want to vent to the outside and need any and all advice on doing this the proper way.
 
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Old 01-07-09, 08:57 PM
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You really have to work it out depending on the surrounding structure. Common techniques include running the vent vertically through the attic and out a roof jack, or if the floor joists are running in the correct direction to run between the floor joists of the floor above to an exterior wall. There also ways to vent downwards and then run horizontally to an exterior wall.

Another option with some of the more expensive range hoods is where you place the blower, it can be located either in the hood or externally on the wall or roof, in some cases this can simplify routing the exhaust.
 
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Old 01-08-09, 07:58 AM
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Thanks for the info Michael Thomas. Would I have to open the wall behind the stove and cupboards to install the pipe through to the attic?
 
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Old 01-08-09, 08:33 AM
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The first step is to determine the manufacturer's venting requirements for the range hood you have selected, for example the range hood in my kitchen requires an 8" round duct or equivalent (50 square inches), and you are not allowed to reduce that at any point during the duct run.

A wall framed with two by fours has a 3 1/2 inch cavity on the interior, so there is no way that you could duct my hood up a within a typical residential wall, you would have to build a box (called a "chase") to enclose it. Fortunately, my kitchen is on the top floor, so I could go directly up through the attic and roof.

For reasons like these it's very difficult to give "generic" advice about the routing and installation of range hoods which are not in close proximity to an exterior wall, once you start routing the duct work through interior spaces and structures each installation is unique and specific to the structure.
 
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Old 01-08-09, 07:14 PM
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I do have a 3 1/2 inch cavity and can go directly through to the attic. The hood calls for a rectangular duct. Can I use an insulated dryer coil to vent? or is that totally unacceptable?
 
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Old 01-08-09, 10:42 PM
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If your cabinets go up to the ceiling, you can mount a rectangular duct inside the cabinet. While it reduces cabinet space, it is easier to get into the attic. If there is a gap between the cabinet top and ceiling, you will need a chase, as Michael Thomas suggested.

Think about the construction of a wall. Yes, you could run up between studs, but when up get to the top, dead end. You can't safely cut through to the attic.

Never use dryer hose. A grease fire will not be contained and you will cook your house. You can transition from rectangular to round metal pipe.

I prefer the fan on the outside wall or roof because it drastically cuts the noise level in the kitchen for a given volume of air.
 
 

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