Dual Zone Heating Question


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Old 02-04-10, 11:46 AM
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Question Dual Zone Heating Question

I currently have a dual zone heating system in my house.

In the daytime(when my wife is home), I set the upstairs unit to 59 degrees and close all the bedroom and bathroom doors.
I set the downstairs unit to 67 degrees.

At night, I set the downstairs to 59 degrees and upstairs to 67 and still leave all the bedroom/bathroom doors closed when sleeping.

Since, I have a very open indoor structure(double ceilings), I thought that controlling the temperature like this was the best way.

However, I was told by somebody that both zones should be kept to the same temperature, otherwise it would be like they are fighting each other. Therefore, if somebody can tell me, if what I am doing is correct. If not, what should I be doing?


My house is a 4 bedroom 3,200 sq ft house.


Thanks,
Ashish
 
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Old 02-04-10, 03:35 PM
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1st you have two systems not zones.
2nd if they are heat pumps you should set the temp and leave it.
3rd if they are gas what you are doing now is fine. I will say leaving the down stairs unit at 67 would help your upstairs unit not run as much.
 
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Old 02-05-10, 12:39 AM
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Airman, he could have two zones off of one furnace but for his sake I hope not.

Ashishm02, do you have two furnaces or heat pumps? If only one but also have two thermostats then you do indeed have a two zone system and all I can offer is my condolences. Zoning of a residential forced air heating system is usually a mistake, often a BIG mistake.
 
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Old 02-05-10, 07:27 PM
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Arrow

I am sorry I did not use the right wording. Its a 1 year old house.

There is one furnace in the basement, which only provides heat to the 1st floor rooms(living room, kitchen, dining room, etc...).

There is another furnace in the attic, which only provides heat to the 2nd floor rooms(4 bedrooms, bathroom, upstairs hallway).

So, with that said, am I doing it right? Or would you guys do something else?


Thanks,
Ashish
 
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Old 02-05-10, 07:44 PM
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Are they Heat pump or gas?
 
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Old 02-06-10, 05:23 PM
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Originally Posted by airman.1994 View Post
Are they Heat pump or gas?
It is natural gas. (Payne PG9MAB furnace).


Thanks,
Ashish
 
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Old 02-06-10, 08:36 PM
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You should be fine with what you are doing.
 
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Old 02-07-10, 08:24 AM
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Thanks for your help. I will continue to do what I have been doing.
 
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Old 02-17-10, 02:54 PM
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Zoning of a residential forced air heating system is usually a mistake, often a BIG mistake.
sorry to hijack the thread a little, but

I have forced hot air system with a single oil furnace and two zones (1st floor and 2nd floor - two thermostats, two dampers on two trunks split from the one right after coming out of the furnace - the controller actually has room for a third zone). Can you describe, or is there are article somewhere that describes what is bad? I am wondering what sort of things I should look out for or be concerned about.

I've actually been thinking about having some of the duct work redone from where the two trunks originate above the furnace and then run together before the second floor zone heads up to the attic. It runs through an area that I would like to have more headroom. If I am better off with a single zone, maybe I could get that headroom by just having the part of the 2nd floor run that is in the basement come off of the 1st floor trunk where it heads to the second floor and get rid of the whole first part of that 2nd floor run.

I'm also wondering because the 2nd floor zone doesn't seem to be worth anything. It almost always stays warm enough with the 1st floor running enough to keep the 1st floor livable. The only exception is the middle of night when the 1st floor is turned down and it is the middle of winter and the 2nd floor actually drops enough to need to kick in.

But... when it does kick in I get almost no air out of the second floor runs. I've had the damper checked - it opens. I've checked for obstructions, been up in the attic looking for some part of the line that separated or anything else causing a huge loss and haven't found anything. If I close all but one 2nd floor vent as a test I do get some air flow, but otherwise it is just a trickle.
 
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Old 02-17-10, 05:01 PM
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You have duct issues. Most single zone systems have issues! When you add more zones that just make the issue worse. Best option is two units. Only other option is to have the duct work sized correctly. Zone units are very expensive to run. two systems would be cheaper to run have less issues and if one unit goes out you still have heat and ac.
 
 

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