It is worth upgrading to better central air filters?

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  #1  
Old 10-13-10, 07:10 PM
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It is worth upgrading to better central air filters?

My central air conditioning system uses replaceable filters that I don't change quite as often as I should - perhaps twice per year or so. I was about to order more replacement filters, when the supplier's website informed me that if I purchased and installed a $50 kit, I could start using more effective filters.

My filters are MERV 10, and the new ones (made compatible with the kit) are MERV 13. I've read the MERV rating tables, and I understand that it's a measure of the effectiveness of a filter.

What I want to know is whether upgrading from MERV 10 to MERV 13 would have any realistic benefit in a standard-sized, tobacco-free home. My wife is sensitive to dust, and I have some seasonal pollen allergies, but I gather that both of these particulates are covered well below MERV 10.

The kit costs $50, and the replacement filters cost about $8 more than the ones we currently use. Do the benefits really offset the cost?

Many thanks for any info.
 
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Old 10-13-10, 08:53 PM
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I'm guessing this is a space guard! Replacing it twice a year is good! Does not need to be done more! As far as the difference there would be some but only way to tell would be with a particle counter. I would worry about ESP ( static presure) with going to the merv 13
 
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Old 10-14-10, 09:13 AM
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I agree, keep your $50 and save the extra $8 per filter
 
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Old 10-15-10, 07:42 AM
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Excellent info, many thanks. I'll stick with with MERV 10 filters. Could I trouble someone for a summary of ESP (static pressure) as it relates to central-air systems? It was mentioned earlier.
 
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Old 10-15-10, 11:39 AM
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ESP or External Static Pressure is the load an air handling system sees. It is measured in inches of water column and is the pressure difference between the return side ductwork and the discharge side ductwork of an air handling system (air conditioning system in this case). In other words it is the resistance a fan must overcome to transfer the required air volume in a system

Blocked or dirty ductwork will increase the ESP as well as different kinds of air filters. Some air filters provide more air resistance than others.
 
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