Bathroom and Mold Question

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Old 09-21-13, 09:55 PM
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Bathroom and Mold Question

Last year was my home's 100th birthday. This is my wife and I's first home purchase. We have a downstairs bathroom that is old looking drywall covered in cedar boards, which is partially held on by some sort of construction adhesive.

The paint above our shower/bath has been peeling off for over a year, but we just attributed that to low quality paint that they used. The bathroom has a glass block window instead of a regular window. The exhaust fan was found to have no hose going to the exterior vent. It almost looks like they installed a working exhaust fan and an exterior vent but no ducting, just to pass an inspection, which was a poor inspection as we've continued to find out (remember, first time home buyers). So, obviously we have a big ventilation issue. The upstairs master bath, is directly above the downstairs bathroom.

Well on top of the ventilation issue, we also just had a toilet leak upstairs and the clawfoot tub water supply lines leaking. Clawfoot tub was easy fix, another lipstick on a pig moment was the fix of the toilet. The original builder of the master bath must not have owned a hole saw because he cut a square for the toilet flange, and just left it there to float, installing a toilet on this crap and loading the base of the toilet with what had to be 2 tubes of adhesive caulk to keep it from wobbling. I filled in the square with new plywood and braced from underneath with a 2x4 frame in, and then used a hole saw and screws to fix this problem.

But, both of those leaks ended up soaking the drywall ceiling in the downstairs bathroom. Well, I started removing the drywall ceiling, and completely re-plumbed the upstairs bathroom fixing that leak, then installed a higher CFM fan and ducted it to the outside. As with everything I've done in this house, trying to make a simple repair gets me into a world of work that I had no intention of doing. I can't simply cover something back up if I know it's not right. On a piece of the drywall, I noticed some mold, then I noticed more mold as I started taking more and more off.

So I decided to just rip the cedar boards off and see how extensive this mold issue was, but I wish I hadn't because I didn't really know the extent of illness mold can cause. I started reading more about it after I seen it was on the vertical walls as well. I have a 2 year old daughter that I'm worried about. It seems there's a leak from a patio roof not being properly flashed where it connects to the house. I got 1 wall completely tore out, old drywall and all, and new mold resistant drywall hung. However, the second wall has a lot more mold than the first, and I just want to know if there are things I need to be doing to keep this stuff from spreading around my house. I covered the vent, use HEPA filters in the furnace, run a HEPA filtered/drywall bagged ShopVac, and have my Honeywell air purifier running in the bathroom constantly. I already know about and have had lead painted trim removed from the house, so I went and purchased a full 3M respirator mask, coveralls, and use vinyl to seal off my work areas in any part of the house. But, I just don't know how sick this stuff can make us. Is it something I should have them staying at the in-laws while I work on it or what?

I already have a sinus infection, just from going in to take a shower without a mask on, but I just don't know if I'm sensitive to mold. My wife and kid are not sneezing or nose running or anything, but I have the bathroom off limits and sealed up as I am waiting on a drywall guy to come in a few days to tear out and hang new drywall.

I don't think this is a severe mold problem, but I don't know how potent a little mold can be.

This is showing the discoloration at the bottom of the wall under the window where I believe is still wet. Also, you can't see it very clearly but the mastic around some of the nails have small patches of blackish-colored mold, about the size of Q-Tip heads


Closer look at the mold on the adhesive mentioned in the previous pic


P-Trap of upstairs bath, water was leaking not from there, but from the supply line holes cut were not sealed. So, when my daughter splashed during her baths, it just drained right down into the drywall below


More of the water lines, and bath upstairs. I have contractor paper covering a very damaged piece of drywall, with a lot more mold present there. I sprayed that with a lot of bleach solution and covered it, so when it dried up, it wouldn't be as likely to spread around
 
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Old 09-22-13, 04:48 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

Mold needs 2 things to grow - heat and moisture, take away either one and it won't survive. Often a bleach/water solution will kill/remove the mold, there are also other products tailor made for dealing with mold but I'm not that familiar with them To play it safe, I'd use a bath rm paint for your finish. They have extra mildewcide and are formulated for the harsher environment of a bath rm with shower.
 
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Old 10-02-13, 09:30 PM
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Mold

I feel your pain. I live in a house that was built in the 1940's and when doing a kitchen renovation, I ended up re-plumbing the entire upstairs bathroom. First of all, all mold can be dangerous but to varying degrees. It mostly depends on how sensitive you are to it. Some people can handle small amounts of mold exposure with no symptoms, while other people get sinus infections and break out in rashes. I know two websites that can get you up to speed pretty quick on the risk you are involved in:

One is www.epa.gov . Its from the EPA and they provide a pretty good comprehensive guide on mold and mold removal.

The second website is removemoldguide.com . Its a simple little website, but has good info. You might want to start with the mold info page.

Like the previous guy mentioned, moisture is the key. Mold can go dormant if the humidity is low enough.

Without knowing the full extent of the mold problem, its hard to assess the risk of your family. It sounds like you are taking the right precautions to me, but check out those websites and see if you agree.
Hope this was helpful. Good Luck.
 
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Old 10-02-13, 11:59 PM
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The pictures show very light mold growth. I'd recomend a negative air machine for this work and vented to the outside
 
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Old 11-12-14, 12:26 AM
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Have you tried the Bleach? Bleach is very effective in killing mold. Well, I suggest you take a short steps here below:

Bleach produces harsh fumes so make sure the area is well ventilated before you begin. You should also wear gloves during the process to protect your hands.

For killing mold with bleach use a ratio of one cup of bleach per gallon of water (ie about 1 part bleach to 10 parts water).

Apply the solution to non-porous surfaces with mold growth either by using a spray bottle or by using a bucket and a sponge or cloth.

You don't need to rinse the surface afterwards (unless it is used for food preparation or a surface which may be touched by small children or pets) as the bleach will inhibit mold growing in the future.
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Picture source:airbetter site
 
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Old 11-12-14, 04:46 AM
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You don't need to rinse the surface afterwards (unless it is used for food preparation or a surface which may be touched by small children or pets) as the bleach will inhibit mold growing in the future.
It also needs to be rinsed if you intend to paint! the bleach residue can affect the new paint's bond with the substrate.
 
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Old 11-12-14, 01:23 PM
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original post over a year old. But bleach DOES NOT give any residual killing power after 24 hours.
 
 

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