Drilled into dryer exhaust pipe - seeking advice on how to fix

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Old 09-29-13, 06:08 PM
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Drilled into dryer exhaust pipe - seeking advice on how to fix

Hello, this is my first post and feel I like a complete idiot and looking for some advice. Any input is greatly appreciated.

I recently was trying to mount a pot rack/hanger in the kitchen (used a stud finder) and mistakenly drilled into the dryer exhaust pipe located behind the drywall. I was able to determine that it was the dryer exhaust - it was emitting a tiny amount of air when the dryer located directly on the floor below was on. I turned it off immediately being aware of the carbon monoxide emission and currently not using the dryer until I can resolve this issue.

Any input appreciated on how to correct?

Attached are a few pics, I cut about a 1"x1" area out of drywall around the drilled hole.

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Old 09-29-13, 06:13 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

You could use a piece of foil tape to reseal that if you can get it in there otherwise use a small amount of high heat silicone like that which would be used for a car.

There is very low pressure there. It won't take much to seal it.
 
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Old 09-29-13, 06:17 PM
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Thank you PJmax. I dont think I can get the foil tape around the exhaust pipe (unless I cut the drywall more). So maybe like you said the high heat silicone ....like this?

Shop IMPERIAL Silicone Sealant at Lowes.com
 
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Old 09-29-13, 06:17 PM
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carbon monoxide emission Is not a problem with dryer vent. Foil tape is the best to use if can get in.
 
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Old 09-29-13, 06:24 PM
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thanks pugsi, I will definitely look into that and see about the foil tape if I can get into enough contact area..... Thanks to both comments so far!!!! Much appreciated.
 
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Old 09-29-13, 06:34 PM
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carbon monoxide emission Is not a problem with dryer vent.
A gas dryer yes...Electric no.......

Yes a small square of metal tape would be best... Make sure its the real metal tape and not the plastic backed fake stuff that will melt... read the temp ratings on the label to be sure... I believe it says 600F or something in that area.
 
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Old 09-29-13, 06:46 PM
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My fault, it's an electric dryer.
 
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Old 09-30-13, 07:06 AM
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id dab silicone on it and be done
 
  #9  
Old 09-30-13, 05:43 PM
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Code requires SMOOTH wall pipe for a reason, no screws or other to catch wet sticky lint as it flows by. Just cut an access hole to studs each side, cut a section of pipe out, add new pipe. No unapproved MM patch job to worry about to burn the house down and HO Insurance denies coverage.

Gary
 
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Old 09-30-13, 08:47 PM
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I think there is something else going on with this exhaust pipe for the electric dryer....looks to be a long term issue....

Downstairs where the dryer is located (which is directly below the kitchen area where I drilled into the exhaust pipe by mistake) there is a good bit of lint which looks to be falling from the basement ceiling above it and vent access point into the ceiling. I'm sure its not from the little hole issue I created, this looks to have been going on for a long time. The lint is coming down from the ceiling and is covering the back of the dryer, piping, and misc. Please see the pics I just took. I think I have to get someone in here to check this out.....It appears that there is some kind of larger breaker in the dryer vent that happened way before I bought this house two weeks ago....pics are attached of the lint that is coming down....

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Old 09-30-13, 08:59 PM
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It's hard to completely visualize your setup but I can see metal flex going from the dryer to ?

I'm guessing it's somehow supposed to be connected with that hard duct you drilled thru. It looks like the flex duct disappears going into the floor so that would mean you can't see if it is actually connected to the metal duct.

That flexible metal duct should only be used for short runs. In your case, since your dryer line travels vertically up the cellar wall, it should be solid metal duct from the dryer to outside to minimize lint collection.
 
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Old 09-30-13, 09:06 PM
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thanks PJmax,
I looked on Angies list and found a highly reviewed dryer vent cleaner/repairer in the area. I think I'm in over my head on this one. The home was a full rehab in 2005. I'm kinda surprised the home inspector (and myself) did not see all the lint a few months back during inspection (pics from my previous post) and raise some kind of flag. Anyhow guess I'll see what a pro says...thanks again for everyones input. I will give an update soon...
 
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Old 09-30-13, 11:13 PM
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That flexible metal duct should only be used for short runs.
That flex pipe is plastic... Not to code...

Must be rigid or semi rigid with a smooth interior.

Thats the code as I know it.
 
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Old 10-01-13, 05:16 AM
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I'm having the same problem as PJ, not really getting a clear picture of the whole thing, but just want to add that cleaning and correcting the line is not a difficult task at all, and most likely something that you could do yourself. 4" metal duct, elbows, metallic tape, a tape measure, and a pair of tin snips will pretty well do you, and are all available at your local hardware or big box. Particularly with a vertical run, I would tape all of the joints and seams, so would want to remove the old pipe anyway, to ensure that is done, and getting that out may be the hardest part, but still shouldn't be overwhelming. The elbows can be adsjusted to any angle that you want, so seldom is there a need for any custom fabrication.
 
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Old 10-01-13, 09:13 PM
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I agree, metal flex is fine in the room with the dryer, limited to 8' maximum length; http://www.hcpdc.com/pdf/Dryer%20Ven...quirements.pdf

Contact your local Building Department/Fire Marshall for requirements.

Gary
 
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Old 10-01-13, 09:37 PM
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I dont think that code is valid about the flexible duct... Or KY has not adopted it yet. Thats from 2008.

You need to check the NFGC itself...
 
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Old 10-02-13, 10:19 AM
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In that example I was showing the length of flex pipe allowed and only used in that room, and instructed the OP to ask locally. In Maryland (the OP), he is under the 2006 IMC and IRC; Maryland Building Codes

"Clothes dryer transition ducts used to connect the appliance to the exhaust duct system shall be limited to single lengths not to exceed 8 feet (2438 mm) and shall be listed and labeled for the application. Transition ducts shall not be concealed within construction."----- Chapter 5 - Exhaust Systems

"M1502.4.3 Transition duct. Transition ducts used to connect the dryer to the exhaust duct system shall be a single length that is listed and labeled in accordance with UL 2158A. Transition ducts shall be a maximum of 8 feet (2438 mm) in length. Transition ducts shall not be concealed within construction."----- Chapter 15 - Exhaust Systems

On the books since at least '96; "Flexible duct connectors used in connection with domestic dryer exhausts shall be metallic, not more than 6 feet (1829 mm) in length and an approved type. Flexible duct connectors shall not be concealed within construction."--------http://publicecodes.cyberregs.com/icod/imc/1996/icod_imc_1996_5_sec004.htm

Gary
 
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Old 10-02-13, 10:28 AM
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The coil duct they talk about I believe is not the foil looking one that also comes in white... They are not metal.

Maryland and NJ follow the same plumbing code I will check the actual gas code and quote back here in a bit.

Just the statement smooth interior should be enough to know the accordion stuff is not permitted..but I need to re read what you posted gary...

Although like I said local codes may not have adopted current changes..

I will check.
 
 

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