sheetrock directly over return air duct?


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Old 01-07-14, 08:24 PM
J
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sheetrock directly over return air duct?

I'm finishing my basement and see that the return air ducts are basically panned off joists.

I'm planning on sheetrocking the ceiling and insulating around the supply sir ducts.

Can I sheetrock directly over the return air ducts (direct to the joists covering the panned off return air ducts) or do I need to add insulation between the duct and the sheetrock. I thought about adding some rigid foam between the return air ducts and the sheetrock?

I was not sure if return air ducts might sweat above the finished ceiling?

Any thoughts?

Thanks,
John
 
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Old 01-07-14, 09:02 PM
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Return air is generally air that is room temperature, returning to be re-conditioned. As such, it would usually be 68-78. I doubt it would sweat.

Your supply air is what could sweat in the summer when its humid the AC is running. That air has just come from your AC coil and could be 50-55, which is often lower than the dewpoint. Those ducts should be insulated.
 
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Old 01-08-14, 08:08 PM
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Thanks Sleeper

Thanks Sleeper for the quick reply - much appreciated....

planning on insulating hte supply side for sure.

Would like to hear from others who have viewed as well...trying to find a consensus....FWIW - i was thinking along the same lines as XSleeper but wanted to hear some opinions before finishing up the job.

Thanks again,
John
 
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Old 01-11-14, 09:50 PM
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You're planning to screw the sheet rock right to the joists?
Its more common to have firring strips, hat channel or something perpendicular to the joists w/ rock attached to that. That would give you the (small) offset.
Part of the rationale for this approach is that it helps level the ceiling in case joist bottoms are not all level. As example in this case the metal flashing (I'm assuming is nailed to joists) would cause a slight hump in the ceiling.

I'm am not a pro installer... but when I finished the basement in my last house, I screwed the rock right to teh joists... which I *thought* were level. once it was done and I turned the lights on, you could see many "warbles" from it.
Now w/ a higher ceiling (this was 7') and proper lighting, it may not be noticeable...
 
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Old 01-13-14, 01:31 PM
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Thanks

Thanks Ratlab,

Yeah that was my plan until I saw your post.....now Im rethinking it....but truth be told I'd hate to lose any more height.....It's an older house so the basement height was not great to begin with 7'4 (if I remember right)....start adding in flooring, furring strips, and rock and it quickly diminishes....I did think about the joists and even went as far as putting a string across the bottom of them to ensure they were all pretty close....and they were.....if it helps I am planning on texturing the ceiling as well (knock down)......

now you have me rethinking that plan as well.......

If anyone takes a peak at this and wishes to reply - please chime in....
thanks again,
John
 
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Old 01-13-14, 03:32 PM
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If the bottom of the joists are close enough, then forget the furring strips and sheetrock it like you planned on doing.
 
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Old 01-13-14, 05:18 PM
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Well, I'll tell you what we did...

Once we were finished w/ drywall and paint, the "warble" was pretty obvious. Wasn't until the paint was dry.
Our ceiling also was 7' finished height so you had a better view.

Well, I got a bucket of the thick mud "popcorn" ceiling stuff, and one of those big open rollers to put it on. It's kind a like a roll of the male-side of velcro but bigger.
I rolled it on (that is messy btw, wear old clothes!) so it was "sippled"... then while it was still wet, took the bristled end of a broom, stuck it on the wall and twisted ~90 degrees clockwise. This made kind of a lined swirl pattern. Then did this all over the place, specifically NOT in patterns but randomly everywhere. Some overlapping, some not... it was fun.

The visual texture completely hid any imperfections, and people were always commenting how cool it looked.

Oh and the dirty little secret? That only happened b/c my wife was helping put the stipples on and drug the roller once, and made a swirl... on the spot we decided to do that to cover it up...
 
 

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