May I cut a hole on the exterior wall to install a bathroom exhaust fan?


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Old 11-08-14, 09:17 AM
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May I cut a hole on the exterior wall to install a bathroom exhaust fan?

Hi everyone,

I am new in this area and just have a question to see if anybody can help.

I bought an old house recently, and there is no exhaust fan for one of the bathrooms. So after each shower there is water condensation on the surface of wall and ceiling. Not sure why there isn't exhaust fan or it was removed for some reason by previous owner. Anyway, I have to solve this issue now.

The specific question is, may I cut a hole on the exterior wall to install an exhaust fan and outlet, or what is the best solution/design for this? I know normally the fan is put on the ceiling, which however may cause a lot of work even if possible as this bath room is on the 1st floor of a 2-storey house.

Any advice/suggestions would be appreciated.

Thank you in advance,

-York
 
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Old 11-08-14, 09:25 AM
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I don't think there would be any issue other than making sure a short exhaust run doesn't allow cold air back into the room.
 
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Old 11-08-14, 10:08 AM
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Depending upon the LOCAL code, (the only code that matters) if the bathroom has an opening window then there may be no requirement for an exhaust fan.
 
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Old 11-08-14, 10:12 AM
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I would suggest that you install it in the ceiling, it's not as hard as you think. Drill the exhaust hole out the rim joist... which should be the only hole you need to drill. Don't drill the exhaust hole through any ceiling joists. Depending on which way the ceiling joists run (they are "usually" perpendicular to the exterior wall) you should easily be able to run the duct that way. Even if they are parallel to the wall you can install it in the last bay next to the wall and with a long bit you should be able to drill though the joists and fish a wire to power the fan off the light. Either way, if you put it in the ceiling or in the wall, you're going to need to do some drywall repair to mount the fan. So put it in the ceiling where it's supposed to be. The electrical will be much easier.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 07:15 AM
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Hi Marksr /Furd / XSleeper,

Thank you all for your comments and/or suggestions!

yes there mostly like will be air/wind leak issue if install it right on the wall, but good thing is it is the easiest or least work.

There is a window in that bathroom, however it is only usable in seasons other than winter. So a fan is still necessary. In fact, a large area of paint peeling off from the ceiling these days reminded me of the severity of this issue.

To do a decent one, probably I will need to put it on the ceiling. But I will do a little more research of my ceiling structure. Will post any more specific questions here as I progress.

Thank you all again!

-York
 
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Old 11-09-14, 07:37 AM
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More info -

The wall or ceiling was made of plaster instead of drywall, which will make my work a little more difficult. BTW, what's the good way to cut plaster walls?

There is a passage connecting all bathrooms down to basement for clothes dropping to laundry. I wonder if this is a good idea to make use of this passage, and in basement I can merge this duct to the dryer's exhaust duct.

What do you think?

Thanks again!
 
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Old 11-09-14, 07:45 AM
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Not a good idea to merge to dryer duct. Not sure about the rest.
 
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Old 11-09-14, 09:06 AM
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For cutting into plaster, use a sawzall and a short 6 TPI demolition blade. I agree that merging ducts is a bad idea.
 
 

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