Hot air blowing outside


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Old 11-15-14, 01:06 PM
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Exclamation Hot air blowing outside

I live in an old house in Montana and it's really tough to keep it warm enough. I noticed these 2 pipes outside, the one on the right is sucking in cold air and the one on the left in constantly blowing out hot air. I don't know where they're coming from, but don't like the fact that hot air is blowing out when it's freezing inside. Can someone tell me what these are? Can I block the one blowing out hot air?
 
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Old 11-15-14, 01:22 PM
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Someone more knowledgeable will be along at some point, but, in the mean time, NO, do not block those, as they are the intake and exhaust for your furnace. Stay tuned, but I also suspect that they are not supposed to be that close to the dryer vent. Regardless, it looks like you may need to clear the dryer vent of lint.
 
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Old 11-15-14, 01:22 PM
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I'm going to guess that you have a high efficiency heating system and those are the intake and exhaust pipes for that unit. And you cannot block either.

But we can help you deal with the cold if you would like.

Bud
 
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Old 11-15-14, 01:38 PM
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Thanks Bud, I need all the help I can get. But why would it have to blow out so much heat?
 
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Old 11-15-14, 02:48 PM
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That is essentially the chimney for the fire inside your furnace. The high efficiency process captures so much of the heat before it is exhausted that they can use those PVC pipes, one is intake and the other is exhaust. If it were a traditional furnace the exhaust would be going straight up where you are used to seeing it and it would be much hotter.

Since I'm not a pro on HVAC we will wait to see if one of the pros can comment on the dryer vent Pedro pointed out.

Montana, are you heating with gas or oil? Comfort issues are usually associated with excess fuel consumption so are you using more fuel than you would expect?

Just trying to sort out the comfort vs heat loss situation.

Bud
 
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Old 11-15-14, 04:21 PM
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We're heating with natural gas. This house is so old that it loses heat all over the place, even though I try to have the doors and windows sealed up as much as possible. I think I'm going to put in a new foundation in the spring because it's on a crumbling foundation with a dirt floor. Some of the house is only 6 inches above dirt so we can't even get under there. The floors on the ground floor are absolutely freezing. I think the new foundation will fix a lot of our problems next year. Just trying to figure out what I can do to keep it warmer this winter, which is just starting and we have about 6 months to go up here!

Plus last night we had a 4.5 earthquake. Luckily the old foundation held up and the house didn't collapse :-)

One more thing, the photo shows an addition onto the old house. This new part of the house has electric heat so I don't know why the furnace from the old house would be vented out that way, unless the addition went over where it was vented before.
 
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Old 11-16-14, 01:01 AM
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You must be up by Flathead Lake, nice country. Born in Missoula but only back to visit a couple of times.

A temporary fix that might help would be some plastic around that foundation, from the house down to the ground to slow the air leakage. Also, the shrink wrap plastic over the windows adds an extra layer and blocks more leakage.

Ultimately the dirt floor down there will need to be covered with a heavy plastic, probably when they do the foundation. I would have then excavate a couple of feet so you would have access to the rim of the house which also should be air sealed and insulated.

I've added a reference link for new home owners and one for crawlspace renovations.
http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...build-renovate
http://www.buildingscience.com/docum...es?full_view=1

Bud
 
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Old 11-16-14, 03:20 AM
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Welcome to our forums!

Sealing up an old house is not necessarily the first thing you would do.
You need some air change and by sealing up an old house you could shift the problem from being cold to causing problems with the structure from too much moisture.

More pics and details would help.
A pic and information on the furnace and what type of windows, attic insulation, basement/crawlspace insulation, etc would help us help you.
 
 

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