Dryer Duct Through Joist?

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Old 12-01-14, 11:20 AM
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Dryer Duct Through Joist?

We raised our garage floor in our garage to be same level as the rest of the house to use it as a family room. Our laundry room was also raised but now I'm having issues trying to vent the dryer (before the dryer was getting vented into the garage which was wrong and causing problems but now I want to vent it out like it is suppose to be).

In the picture I attached is how the floor joists were setup and where the dryer is and where it needs to vent. The red line being the duct (its the only possible outside wall unless i go through the attic). The problem is in the way there is that 2x10 joist that runs the length of the garage (18 feet). Can I notch or bore a 4" hole for the dryer duct? currently that joist is about 2 inches of the ground with some sleepers underneath it for support.

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Old 12-01-14, 11:28 AM
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Why wouldn't you push the exhaust out the back wall near the dryer?
 
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Old 12-01-14, 11:38 AM
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That leads to the house, its not an outside wall. In the picture the only outside walls are the one I marked as outside wall and the one on the top of the picture which would be the garage door(where there is a plywood on the floor in the picture). The picture is not our actual garage just an example
 
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Old 12-01-14, 11:42 AM
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The picture is not our actual garage just an example
Now you tell me

Hang tight for the pros but I think you're proposing too big a cut.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 12:46 PM
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Install supporting structure from the cross joist to the floor on either side of the duct hole and you should be fine.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 01:21 PM
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Since its so low to the ground all I can add for support are some treated sleepers and shims, which should be enough..

Can the 4" hole be made towards the top of the joist (like a large notch), or does it have to be in the middle, the reason I asks is if i make it in the middle the duct will exit the house a little low, if I make it like a notch at the top of the joist then I should barely make the 1 foot clearance from the ground on the outside
 
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Old 12-01-14, 01:37 PM
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With the ends of the cross joist properly supported you can remove it completely where you want to run the duct.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 02:08 PM
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Thanks! I will do that
 
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Old 12-01-14, 02:35 PM
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Since you will be using smooth bore vent pipe, why not run it under the joists. Only plumbers cut perfectly good joists to install their pipes, and the never tell the carpenters
 
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Old 12-01-14, 03:46 PM
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Please tell be that's not a real picture of what your trying to build!
Your building a garage that's just sitting on post blocks.
Any wood within 18" of grade needed to be pressure treated.
There's no joist hangers shown in that picture.
Sure looks like your using wider joist then the rim joist.
There's no permit and inspection on this job?
 
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Old 12-01-14, 03:57 PM
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Since you will be using smooth bore vent pipe, why not run it under the joists. Only plumbers cut perfectly good joists to install their pipes, and the never tell the carpenters
This is for a attached car garage that converted to a room, the floor got raised about 12 inches to be in level with the rest of the house. I have about 1-2 inches of room under the joists, no way I can fit the dryer pipe there
 
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Old 12-01-14, 04:07 PM
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Do as Furd suggested and support the joists on either side and eliminate the cross piece all together. Still use smooth bore pipe and not plastic or corrugated aluminum type.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 04:21 PM
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Do as Furd suggested and support the joists on either side and eliminate the cross piece all together. Still use smooth bore pipe and not plastic or corrugated aluminum type.
Yeah already bought some of the smooth galvanized steel round pipe. One questions about these though, I'm wondering if I can weld/solder the joints/connections on these. Since I won't have access to them once the floor is up I rather due that then use the foil tape, has anyone done that?
 
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Old 12-01-14, 04:22 PM
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The simple solution is to always place the dryer against an outside wall then plan around it.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 04:27 PM
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The simple solution is to always place the dryer against an outside wall then plan around it.
Unfortunately that's how the house was build, moving the dryer to an outside wall would mean also moving the washer, which means moving the plumbing and creating new drain pipes, alot more work and money, not to mention I wouldn't have access to the plumbing if something went wrong or started leaking later without taking the floor apart..but trust me I thought about it
 
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Old 12-01-14, 04:55 PM
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On the round hard pipe, use HVAC type foil duct tape along the long seam and around the joints after you screw them together. It will make them mostly leak proof. Use a credit card or other hard item to press the tape firmly against the metal. I don't think you will be very successful in welding/soldering the metal since its walls are so thin. The tape is pretty good for that purpose.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 05:07 PM
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The proper foil tape alone used as Chandler details is all you need. Do NOT use any sheet-metal screws to hold the sections together as the points will collect lint and also be an impediment to brushing out the duct when needed.
 
 

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