Bathroom exhaust fan location ?


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Old 01-12-15, 08:01 AM
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Bathroom exhaust fan location ?

Hi All,

Recently bought a house which does not have an exhaust fan in the bathroom. It does have a skylight which we open during showers to allow for ventilation. This works fine in the fall/spring/summer months, but you can feel the cool air coming in in the winter.

I would like to put in an exhaust fan, but not sure about where it should be positioned. I'll explain the situation and photo is attached. Can't see the skylight in the photo, but can see the walls leading up to it.

The shower is enclosed with glass walls on two sides with a fully open top. About 1/2-2/3 of the area above the shower includes a ceiling above it with a light fixture. The ceiling then has four walls which are angled and extend up to the roof area where we have the skylight. Sorry, don't have a better picture at this time, but you can see the angled walls. When showering, the steam obviously gets on the ceiling above the shower and also goes up to the skylight portion.

One option I see is to replace the light above the shower with an exhaust fan. However, since this isn't the highest point of the ceiling, I'm afraid that the exhaust fan won't be powerful enough to catch all of the moisture and we will continue to have the problem of moisture build up at the skylight area, leading to potential damage to the drywall. Not sure if there are any exhaust fans that can be installed with the skylight in place. Ideally I would like to leave the skylight as is to use in the warmer months. Thank you in advance for the help!
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Old 01-12-15, 09:02 AM
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Replacing the light in the shower with a combo light/fan is a great idea, as long as that's an outside wall. If you buy a good unit, it will work well. They are rated in CFM.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 09:23 AM
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I have a exhaust fan in my shower and it's ceiling is not the highest part of the room but it still works very well. In the summer we run the fan when showering and for about 15 minutes after to remove as much moisture as possible. Since you are at the source of the moisture you're removing mostly the humid air you want to get as opposed to a fan out in the main room where you're drawing a lot from the general room which doesn't need to be removed.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 09:46 AM
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Thanks for the responses. Unfortunately, the bathroom is situated in the middle of the house with the back wall near the shower being a shared wall with a neighbor, the opposing wall leading to a hallway and the side walls adjoining bedrooms. I'll probably have to call in a contractor to run it straight up to the roof. Wish it was a job I could do myself, but putting holes in my roof makes me nervous.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 09:51 AM
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Replacing the light in the shower with a combo light/fan is a great idea, as long as that's an outside wall.
Care to expand on that statement. I have and have seen many installs of exhaust fan on inside wall bathrooms. In fact most bathrooms that have no windows will in fact have an exhaust fan (by code I believe). Those bathrooms that have a window (therefor and outside wall) usually do not have an exhaust fan.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 12:13 PM
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So, it sounds like you have attic above the bathroom. If so that makes it easy to add the fan. The exhaust can be run through the roof or it can to to a gable end of your roof or out through the soffit.

 
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Old 01-12-15, 12:35 PM
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So, it sounds like you have attic above the bathroom. If so that makes it easy to add the fan. The exhaust can be run through the roof or it can to to a gable end of your roof or out through the soffit.

I will have this same issue next spring when I do a bathroom remodel. Is what you describe OK? Does it meet typical code? Is putting an exhaust fan on the underside of soffit safe for the surrounding material? I'm thinking in terms if warm moist air hitting the material and causing possible rot or moisture problems. I never saw this type of install in this area before.
This would be a great solution as opposed to cutting the roof.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 12:43 PM
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We actually live in a row home with a "flat" roof, so no attic. But we may have a space above the ceiling for running the duct through the adjacent room and out on the side of the house. I guess it depends on how the beams run in the ceiling so we have the space to run it through. Would be better than going through the roof. Sorry, I know it's hard to give advice without seeing our layout. Appreciate the help. This project will have to wait a few months.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 01:34 PM
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Norm, I should have said outside wall or somewhere that makes it easy to vent.
 
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Old 01-12-15, 02:00 PM
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Venting high humidity venting under the soffet has its own problems. I've seen the dampers get frozen open.

I have vented to that location but never from a shower directly.
 
 

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