Broan Allure QSIII range hood

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Old 02-10-15, 08:33 PM
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Broan Allure QSIII range hood

In reading a recent thread Handyone had specifically mentioned familiarity with this product so I thought I would throw out some questions about it.

I have this hood and have noticed that the bulbs [39W PAR20] pulsate {meaning the light that comes from them is not even}. It is annoying and seems to be more noticeable when seen peripherally rather than staring straight at the light.

The hood is less than a year old and has always done this. The previous hood [with an incandescent bulb did not do this].

My questions are: Has anyone with familiarity with this hood [and bulbs] had the same result? Is it to be expected? If not, should I just put a meter on the socket to measure for steady voltage? I do not think it is the circuit because other lights on that circuit do not pulsate -- could it just be that is the way PAR20 lights behave [on my second or third set in less than a year ].

Thanks

also: Planning to redo kitchen and in talking with installer/dealer he mentioned a 30" height of range hood off surface of gas stove. Is the 30" to the bottom of the hood or the bottom of the wood cabinet?
 
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Old 02-11-15, 07:29 AM
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It's 30" from cooking surface to bottom of cabinet (combustible material).

PJ is the appliance expert, I'm familiar with the quality and installation of these hoods.
Yes, check bulb socket for voltage fluctuation. Also you mentioned a 39W bulb, if these are CFL or some type of hybrid bulb, you might want to try a conventional halogen. The CFL does not take well to dimming.
Figure the problem soon so you can get warranty service if all else fails.
 
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Old 02-11-15, 07:47 AM
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Just an fyi for you, but big kitchen fans require a built-in makeup air system. What you have may have been installed before this requirement, but if you are planning a renovation, best to consider this before you select a new hood.
"the new IRC provision, which is found in section M1503.4: “Exhaust hood systems capable of exhausting in excess of 400 cfm shall be provided with makeup air at a rate approximately equal to the exhaust air rate."
Makeup Air for Range Hoods | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com

Bud
 
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Old 02-22-15, 09:01 AM
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Thanks:

Handyone- The Broan website specifies the 50-watt version [of the PAR20] so possibly the 39-watt EcoVantage that I am using is inferior. I believe they are halogen.

Bud - Interesting/informative article -- that is something I never considered [as hoped for by the manufacturer]. My contractor did specify in the write-up that it will need to be accounted for since the max CFM [with boost] is 430 -- even though we don't use it in boost mode.

Do you have suggestions on how that will be mitigated inexpensively/efficiently? Could it be as simple as, say, creating an air vent from my crawlspace?
 
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Old 02-22-15, 10:20 AM
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Without re-reading (I'm lazy) the issue is primarily concerned with naturally drafted combustion appliances such as a furnace or water heater. An electric water heater or assisted draft boiler/furnace are less of a problem, as is a sealed combustion system.

Since your fan is not horribly oversized, think 1,200 cfm, it also depends upon how air tight your home is. A normally leaky home, probably not a concern, but a reasonably well air sealed home will be starving for air and easily produce negative pressures to potentially backdraft an appliance.

Has your home been pressure tested (a blower door test) or have you done any extensive air sealing?

Bud
 
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Old 02-22-15, 02:40 PM
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Has not been tested AFAIK but, it is older [late 60's] so I am pretty sure it is not air-tight.

Yeah, being only 30CFM over is probably not a big deal [except to an anal inspector].
 
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Old 02-22-15, 03:07 PM
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Here's a 2010 article and from the 152 comments you can see it is a hot topic. Since most exhaust fans rarely reach advertised ratings yours is probably fine, plus you will see the issue is far from resolved. Whether your code department is that fussy or not, can't say if they even care.
Makeup Air for Range Hoods | GreenBuildingAdvisor.com

Bud
 
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