Venting range hood through a supporting wall up through the roof

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Old 03-26-16, 07:57 AM
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Venting range hood through a supporting wall up through the roof

I'm trying to figure out how to vent the new range hood that I will be installing during our kitchen remodel. It's an under-cabinet hood and the install location is one a supporting wall. I want to use the hood's rear vent option and vent it into the wall, and then up through the wall all the way to the roof. The specs call for a 3 1/4" x 10" rectangular vent and I'm wondering if I can even do that in a supporting wall, because it seems like I'd have to cut away almost the entire section of the wall's top plates (it's a 2x4 wall) to get the vent up through the top of the wall, and wouldn't that have a negative affect on the supporting aspect of the wall? I'm new to this type of work so I'd really appreciate any guidance on this matter.
 
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Old 03-26-16, 08:59 AM
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You generally want to go out the top of the hood and up through the back of the cabinet... through the ceiling.
 
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Old 03-26-16, 09:04 AM
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Where do you plan to vent the 3.25 x 10 duct to the exterior? The roof?
Is this a one-story house?

If you're going up through the roof, I recommend you top vent with 7" round duct (a very few are 6")

This takes up space in the upper cabinet but is the ideal way to duct. I install many hoods and microwave hoods and rear venting is a last resort, unless it is directly through an exterior wall.

Edit: Xsleeper is spot on, it doesn't matter if you use 7" or 3.25 x 10, as long as it's inside the upper cabinet.
 
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Old 03-26-16, 09:29 AM
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I read this as an inside wall. Running the duct up thru the cabinet into the floor above would be an issue. This method would require the duct to be boxed out on the second floor to the attic.
 
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Old 03-26-16, 09:47 AM
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If Pete is right and this is an interior load bearing wall, and you want to go up two stories, there are serious issues.
Some houses have no ductwork for a hood for good reason, there was no way to run it.
 
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Old 03-26-16, 03:25 PM
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It's an interior load bearing wall, but the first two replies here talked me out of using the wall. I'm going up through the ceiling now, through the attic to the roof. This section of house is one story. I'm up on the roof now. I have the hole cut for the duct and just realized I don't know how the duct is to be attached to the vent. The vent doesn't extend down into the hole...the duct is to extend up into the vent...Do I need to use adhesive to secure it or does is just stay put with surface pressure and the duct run beneath it?
 
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Old 03-26-16, 04:42 PM
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Ideally, you will attach the duct to the roof cap after the roof cap is installed. In other words you will be in the attic when connecting the duct to roof cap.

Is that not possible?
 
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Old 03-26-16, 05:02 PM
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You can bend tabs on the top of the duct so it sits on the roof. Make 4-5 one inch deep cuts and bend the tabs over.
 
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Old 03-26-16, 07:52 PM
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Ideally, you will attach the duct to the roof cap after the roof cap is installed. In other words you will be in the attic when connecting the duct to roof cap.

Is that not possible?
That is possible, and it is what I'm planning on doing. I have the roof cap installed now from on top. What I'm not clear on is what, if anything, I need to do to secure the top section of duct after I push it from inside the attic up into the roof cap. The roof cap opening is tight enough that it seems it could hold the duct piece in place without any additional attachment mechanism, especially once the remaining duct sections are installed for a continuous vertical section from the range hood. I'm just not sure if that's an appropriate solution here...

By the way, it's a 7" diameter round vent that I'm using now...the 3.25 x 10 plan went the way of the dodo bird once I changed plans to vent through the top of the hood.
 
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Old 03-26-16, 09:21 PM
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7" round is ideal, good job.
Here's what I like to see in the ceiling when installing new cabinets:

- The duct is centered in the (soon to be installed) cabinet, but this is not critical
- The rear of the round cut out is at least 1-1/2" off the wall. This is so you only cut a hole in the top of the cabinet, and not the back

After you plan the opening, "frame it" a little, insert the duct into the roof cap and nail or screw it into the framing. The framing can be any kind of blocking you need to offset the duct from the rear wall.
 
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