Kitchen vent hood ducting: roof or side wall?


  #1  
Old 04-27-18, 06:11 AM
M
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 85
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Kitchen vent hood ducting: roof or side wall?

Old raised ranch in mid-Atlantic (so snow sometimes can be heavy). Kitchen is in the middle not adjacent to any of the external walls. Currently there is an under the cabinet range hood (so TBD if there is a external duct in the back, at least nothing in the cabinet above).

We'd like to install a external venting range hood in that location, and had a few contractors coming for quote (for other renovations). Most of them suggested against adding a duct straight up through the roof, quoting risks of snow/water getting in especially in heavy snow storms.

My understanding is that going through the roof, you will need some damper that can shut off when vent is not in use and may require some extra work since you are getting a hole through the roof (waterproof etc). But on the other hand, I'm not entirely thrilled about adding a lengthy duct (through the attic and goes out by the external wall in the left of this pix). Not sure about the cost difference (roof vs side wall)

Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
 
Attached Images  
  #2  
Old 04-27-18, 07:42 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 27,364
Received 997 Votes on 908 Posts
IMO the roof is the way to go, however if you live somewhere cold, there is the danger of condensation dripping from any ventilation from inside the house. A damper is often used for either type of duct (up or sideways). A remote fan can be added if needed. The cost (roof vs horizontal) shouldn't be much of a difference. You don't really have a sidewall, it would be going out the soffit, which is not optimum. Duct exhaust generally can't be within 3' from anyplace where that air could be taken back in the house... not near a window, door or soffit vent.

Ideally I don't think it would necessarily run "straight up" the roof, it would probably jog over to where the roof height is easily accessible.

Roof leaks are really not an issue. You likely have other roof penetrations that work just fine, so that's kind of a non argument. If you get 4 feet of snow at a time, you probably have to shovel your roof anyway.
 
  #3  
Old 04-27-18, 11:15 AM
airman.1994's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: VA
Posts: 5,795
Received 8 Votes on 8 Posts
I will agree with X. Not that big a job.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: