Basement Return between Studs

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Old 07-13-19, 07:47 AM
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Basement Return between Studs

I'm re-finishing a previously finished basement. The existing air return in the basement rooms just vented in between the studs with no duct lining. My city inspector said I couldn't do it this way anymore.

Probably a basic question, but can I just buy the duct sheet metal and line the inside cavity of the stud down to where the return will be, sealing the seams with foil tape?

Also, for a basement in my colder climate (Minnesota), should the return be closer to the floor or ceiling?
 
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Old 07-13-19, 08:00 AM
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You can put Thermopan over the studs before the drywall goes up.
 
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Old 07-13-19, 10:25 AM
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You can get narrow oval duct that fits within stud walls, returns typ are at ceiling!
 
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Old 07-13-19, 10:29 AM
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Around here returns are cut into the baseboard. Thats why they are called COLD air ruturns. Hot air rises.
 
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Old 07-13-19, 01:28 PM
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existing air return in the basement

Basements are different, you have cold air down there and want to pull the warm moist air out so that is why basement retrurns are typ higher up than the upper floors!
 
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Old 07-13-19, 01:47 PM
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Honestly, I didn't catch the basement part. But if your returns are high the supplies usually need to be low. In a cold climate you are usually concerned about heating... and part of the purpose of returns is to mix the air. So regardless I would still put the returns low in a basement... especially in Minnesota, with the idea of returning the coldest air in the house with the heated air for comfort. Of course, each house is different. If it was primarily a cooling climate (down south) it would be reversed.
 
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Old 07-14-19, 12:10 PM
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Honestly I don't think it really makes a difference!

I'm sitting here in my den, the returns are high, all the houses we've built for ourselves and customers, the returns are high!

Basementa tend to be high due to duct work on the ceiling!

Depending on heating and cooling season one could argue the benefit of one over the other!

( suspect to some degree it's a regional thing!!
 
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Old 07-18-19, 05:44 PM
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Thanks for the replies. My already-existing supplies are high, coming out of the ceiling, so I was planning to keep the returns low.
 
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Old 07-18-19, 07:53 PM
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Sounds perfect to me.
 
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