How can I redirect air from a vent to another room?

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Old 07-31-20, 03:57 PM
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How can I redirect air from a vent to another room?

Hi,
I have a two story house with separate A/C units up and down. The downstairs A/C is out for the next ten days before I can get it fixed. The upstairs works fine.

Is there some way I can jury rig an upstairs vent by somehow attaching a flexible duct and run the hose downstairs?

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-31-20, 06:13 PM
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Cold air sinks so I dont think anything you do will improve the situation. Cold air will naturally go down the stairs.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 09:37 AM
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Lower the upstairs stat a couple of degrees and set it for Fan "ON" in the interim. If the downstairs blower still works, set that stat for Fan "ON" too.
 
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Old 08-01-20, 09:55 AM
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If you have a forced hot air hearing system, you can try setting the furnace to "fan only" to help even out the upstairs/downstairs air temperature.
 
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Old 08-02-20, 08:07 AM
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Red face

"fan only" never saw a thermostat that had that option, Fan "ON" is all I've seen.
 
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Old 08-02-20, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by ferd42
"fan only" never saw a thermostat that had that option, Fan "ON" is all I've seen.
Correct. Accurate vs precise; e.g. you've never seen "FAN AUTO"...

In summer, I remove the fan access panel from the basement furnace, secure an air filter over the opening, and then use "FAN AUTO" and "A/C" to circulate cool basement air through the house using the heat vents.
I don't HAVE central air, but the thermostat doesn't need to know that. When the temperature gets above 74, the thermostat starts the fan and circulates cool air through the house. The thermostat ALSO puts voltage onto a screw that isn't connected to anything. Result is cool basement air gets pushed up to the warm 1st and 2nd floor rooms, when it's above 74, stops the fan when it's below 74.
 
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Old 08-02-20, 01:42 PM
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Hal,
That's genius! Why didn't you tell me that before I bought whole house A/C?
 
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Old 08-04-20, 12:42 AM
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So no gas water heater, stored combustibles or flammable liquids in the Basement?
 
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Old 08-04-20, 05:05 AM
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That's genius! Why didn't you tell me that before I bought whole house A/C?
Well, it works, but not for long!

Did similar experiment many, many houses ago. There is only so much air volume in the basement, and it's cool since it's been sitting there forever.

After an hour of running the blower all that air is removed and now full of warm humid air that will take a couple days to naturally cool down to the point it can be used again, plus nothing will remove the humidity.

You may get a bit of relief but I guarantee Its no substitute for AC!
 
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Old 08-04-20, 06:45 AM
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Originally Posted by ferd42
So no gas water heater, stored combustibles or flammable liquids in the Basement?
No gas water heater, only flammable liquid is the emergency backup 5 gallon can of fuel oil.

We're along the line for 52 degree ground temperature at depth, so I actually get several hours of cool air

If you're got a newer house with concrete block foundation studded out to make basement walls; floating slab on gravel, covered with carpet, you' just won't have sufficient contact between basement air and actual "ground" to get cooling.

Farmhouse basement, in contrast, has fieldstone walls with whitewash; while the floor is a slab of concrete poured directly on the ground, and likely in contact with bedrock. So I've got around 1,620 sqft of "geothermal heat exchanger" to work with (counting basement floor area and wall area.)

Hmm, guess at some point I SHOULD calculate the heat flow/ heat storage capacity...
 
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Old 08-04-20, 07:01 AM
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The op did not say they have a basement, (2 story, upstairs/downstairs) so let's not hijack their thread.
 
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Old 08-04-20, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper
The op did not say they have a basement, (2 story, upstairs/downstairs) so let's not hijack their thread.
Good point-

However, having separate upstairs/downstairs through-wall units is a common way to add A/C to old masonry homes, (if it was a window unit the OP would just buy a new one, not wait a week to repair it). So, not exactly off topic, but err, anticipating that the house likely has a basement...
 
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Old 08-04-20, 07:31 AM
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OP is in Texas. Basements are not common in the southwest... too hard to dig... easier to pour a pad.
 
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