Dryer duct disconnected - best way to fix?


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Old 05-24-23, 11:00 AM
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Dryer duct disconnected - best way to fix?

I noticed that the floor in my bedroom above the garage got warm in a spot above the dryer duct routing. I was bale to diagnose with a depstech endoscope camera and saw that the duct is disconnected about 28" form the outside after the 45 degree turn. This must be just about the garage door header.

I am looking for some ideas on how to best repair. I was thinking to

possibly pull down the plywood from the bottom the of the overhang and see whether it can be reached.

 
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Old 05-24-23, 11:40 AM
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What is above the duct. Might be easier to pull up flooring, cut an opening, connect duct, reinstall sub floor, reinstall flooring (depending on what it is) vs going from outside which will require some repair to make it look correct.
 
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Old 05-24-23, 11:56 AM
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Unfortunately, above is the master bedroom. It is carpet.
 
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Old 05-24-23, 11:58 AM
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FYI. the disconnected duct. (btw. those cheap endoscope cameras come in handy). Looks to me the builder used duct tape....


 
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Old 05-24-23, 12:01 PM
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If it's about 28" in I'd cut a hole in the garage ceiling. Any repair is on the inside where it's less visible and sheetrock is relatively easy to cut open and repair.

When you get in there your dryer duct should be rigid galvanized steel. There should be a couple screws in each joint holding them together. Then apply metal foil tape to the outside to make it completely airtight. Make sure you thoroughly clean the pipe so the tape can stick.
 
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Old 05-24-23, 12:12 PM
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thanks. To me it looks like that they used for the entire house this type of duct:
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt...HD12/203626513

At least using rigid for the elbow will make the 45" degree more sturdy. Know I wonder where the next connection is inside... A bit worried know about cleaning the duct int the future..
 
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Old 05-24-23, 12:34 PM
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Unfortunately, above is the master bedroom. It is carpet.
Actually that is best, pull the carpet up do repairs, knock carpet back in place and your done? Nothing visual to repair!
 
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Old 05-24-23, 01:24 PM
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Can't see picking up good flooring.

Just a quick FYI..... repair the ductwork using metal foil tape only ...... no screws.
On every other duct you would use screws.

That flex must go. That should never had been used there.
Once you have an access point in the garage.... you can also pull off the vent cover and work thru there.
Remove all that flex. You can attach a piece of solid to the vent cover to reach your splice point.
Insert the vent cover with the duct attached to it.
 
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Old 05-25-23, 07:36 AM
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thanks. Unfortunately, I still will have a good amount of flex duct inside the house. Assuming that duct comes in 8ft sections I am assuming there is another duct tape connection somewhere which will make duct cleaning a bit of a gamble.
 
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Old 05-25-23, 07:54 AM
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The inspectors in my area require rigid steel duct with joints secured by screws. There were some dryer fires where they found the duct disconnected. Not everyone uses the best tape and adhesives can fail over time so they want the duct to stay connected. The screws do catch some lint but luckily the dryer duct cleaning brushes are not affected by the protrusions.

I agree, you really cannot clean flexible duct. The brush will likely damage the flex or disconnect it.
 
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Old 05-25-23, 09:00 AM
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It is somewhat funny that conduit is required for wiring but they don't care about using duct tape on dryer ducts.
 
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Old 05-25-23, 06:53 PM
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Duct tape was never approved for dryer ducts. It just used because everybody has it and it's cheap.
It does not hold up to the heat of the ductwork.

Check this out
 
 

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